hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 307 307 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 13 13 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 10 10 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 7 7 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for May, 1863 AD or search for May, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 4 document sections:

Florida, along the coasts, and within the sounds, rivers, and harbors of this watershed. As an actuality, two centres of operations existed : the one at Port Royal, the depot of supplies and usual headquarters of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; the other within the sounds, and on the coast of North Carolina, over which the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron held watch. In order to avoid confusion, the events of each section are treated separately. It may be added that the writer commanded a vessel in the battle of Port Royal and in subsequent operations along that coast until May, 1863, and was also present in the two bombardments of Fort Fisher. He is under many obligations to the Navy Department, to the Chiefs of Bureau of Ordnance and Construction, and to Colonel Robert N. Scott, U. S. Army, for much valuable information not otherwise attainable, and also to several friends versed in naval and military affairs, for their kindly assistance. Washington, May, 1883.
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: the Monitor class of vessels. (search)
ing of the Weehawken. In a heavy sea the monitors were surprisingly easy in their movements. This was obtained at the cost of great strain on the fastenings of the overhang. When the engines were stopped the vessel, quite unlike ordinary ones, would sheer one way or the other, and no amount of watching could prevent this. As we have already seen, the gun machinery had not that reliability that it was supposed to possess. When under a fair steam-pressure they steered very well. In May, 1863, in answer to the requirement of the Navy Department, all of the officers commanding monitors near Charleston (five in number) submitted their opinion in relation to the qualities of that class, which the Department did not think worth while to give to the public in its Report on Armored Vessels, 1864, made under a Congressional resolution. It might be supposed that this letter had been inadvertently passed over, had it not been that on page 603 Captain Ericsson comments upon one of its p
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
sure through any act of theirs, of any possible effect resulting from their continuous displeasure. the pages preceding the quotations were written before the perusal of the Memoir. If the reader of this volume labors under the idea that either Admiral Dupont or Admiral Dahlgren should have gone to Charleston or made the attempt, the pages of the Memoir may enlighten him. Bearing in mind that the Department did not think it worth while to give publicity to a letter which it evoked in May, 1863, signed by all of the commanders of ironclads in those waters, Captain John Rodgers and Commanders Daniel Ammen, George W. Rodgers, D. M. Fairfax, and John Downes, were the signers, and the letter afterward seen by Captain Drayton and Commander Worden was concurred in by them. and that after the Civil War had ended, it had declined to receive an able and perfectly proper letter concerning operations before Charleston during the period of command of its writer, the Department seems to ha
nside, from January 13. 1862, to July 6, 1862. February, 180212,70014,143 March, 186211,32213,468 April, 186214,05416,528 May, 186214,50816,794 June, 186214,37116,718 July, 18626,4037,947Major-General John G. Foster, from July 6, 1862, to July, 1863. August, 18621,2261,555 September, 18626,6428,647 October, 18628,96711,415 November, 186212,87215,569 December, 186218,46321,917 January, 186323,02328,194 February, 186315,80618,548 March 186314,67217,105 April, 186313,96215,920 May, 186316,64319,715 August, 18637,69910,402Major-General I. N. Palmer, from July, 1863, to August 14, 1863. September, 18637,79410,923Major-General John J. Peck, from August 14, 1863, to April 19, 1864. October, 18636,2768,343 November, 18639,41112,245 December, 18637,2399,038 January, 18649,09511,111 February 29, 186411,21313,606 March, 186411,77214,208 April 30, 18646,3357,669 May, 18646,0417,623Major-General I. N. Palmer, from April 19, 1864, to February 9, 1865 June, 18646,3507,846