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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 18 18 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 13 13 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for May 1st, 1863 AD or search for May 1st, 1863 AD in all documents.

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uth, where it spent the winter of 1862-63. General Sickles was promoted to the command of the corps, and General Hiram Berry to that of Sickles' Division. On May 1, 1863, the corps broke camp and marched to Chancellorsville, an eventful field in its history; a battle in which the brunt of the fighting fell on the Third and Twelfnly two divisions of the Thirteenth Corps--A. J. Smith's and Osterhaus'--participated in this expedition. Upon the opening of the campaign against Vicksburg, May 1, 1863, the Thirteenth Corps was composed of the four divisions of Osterhaus, A. J. Smith, Hovey, and Carr; these were also known, respectively, as the Ninth, Tenth, Teenth Corps, but which did not take part in the Vicksburg campaign. This division fought the battle of Helena, Ark, July 4, 1863. The battle of Port Gibson, May 1, 1863, was fought almost entirely by the Thirteenth Corps, its losses in that action aggregating 125 killed, 678 wounded, and 23 missing; total, 826. The battle of C
ugust, 1862, the men having been recruited from the State at large. Leaving Iowa soon after, it proceeded to Helena, Ark., where it was stationed for a few months, and in January, 1863, took part in General Gorman's Expedition up the White River to Duvall's Bluff. In the spring of 1863, the regiment joined the army in its advance on Vicksburg, having been assigned to Slack's (2d) Brigade, Hovey's Division, Thirteenth Corps. Its first engagement occurred at Port Gibson (Magnolia Hills), May 1, 1863, in which the regiment lost 1 killed and 5 wounded. At the battle of Champion's Hill, May 16th, it sustained a severe loss, having charged, captured, and held a battery of the enemy. It was a daring act, but as it made the advance alone, and without proper arrangement for support, it became the object of a concentrated fire which drove it back in disorder. Its loss at Champion's His was 35 killed, 120 wounded, and 34 missing; total, 189. From January, 1864, it lay encamped at Algiers a
April 12--May 4, 1863.             99th New York Corcoran's Seventh 13 58 -- 71 Fitz Hugh's Crossing, Va.             April 29-30, 1863.             24th Michigan Wadsworth's First 4 20 -- 24 Port Gibson, Miss.             May 1, 1863.             18th Indiana Carr's Thirteenth 19 64 -- 83 29th Wisconsin Hovey's Thirteenth 10 65 -- 75 69th Indiana Osterhaus's Thirteenth 14 45 -- 59 42d Ohio Osterhaus's Thirteenth 12 47 -- 59 Chancellorsville, Va.             May 1-3, 1863.             12th New Hampshire Whipple's Third 41 213 63 317 124th New York Whipple's Third 28 161 15 204 141st Pennsylvania Birney's Third 23 152 60 235 11th New Jersey Berry's Third 18 146 5 169 26th Wisconsin Schurz's Eleventh 23 135 40 198 12th New Jersey French's Second 24 132 22 178 148th Pennsylvania Hancock's Second 31 119 14 164 27th Indiana Williams's Twelfth 20 126 4 150 114th Pennsylvania Birney's Third
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
ng the Ninth Corps. The Virginia Campaign of ‘64 and ‘65: Humphreys; pp. 408-411. As regards the loss in the Union armies, the greatest battles of the war were: Date. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. July 1-3, 1863. Gettysburg 3,070 14,497 5,434 23,001 May 8-18, 1864. Spotsylvania 2,725 13,416 2,258 18,399 May 5-7, 1864. Wilderness 2,246 12,037 3,383 17,666 Sept. 17, 1862. Antietam Not including South Mountain or Crampton's Gap. 2,108 9,549 753 12,410 May 1-3, 1863. Chancellorsville 1,606 9,762 5,919 17,287 Sept. 19-20, 1863. Chickamauga 1,656 9,749 4,774 16,179 June 1-4, 1864. Cold Harbor 1,844 9,077 1,816 12,737 Dec. 11-14, 1862. Fredericksburg 1,284 9,600 1,769 12,653 Aug. 28-30, 1862. Manassas Including Chantilly, Rappahannock, Bristoe Station, and Bull Run Bridge. 1,747 8,452 4,263 14,462 April 6-7, 1862. Shiloh 1,754 8,408 2,885 13,047 Dec. 31, 1862. Stone's River Including Knob Gap, and losses on January 1st and 2
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
20 10th South Carolina Anderson's Withers's 16 91 2 109 10th Texas Cav'y (dismounted) Ector's McCown's 10 93 15 118 Arkansas Post, Ark.             Jan. 11, 1863.             24th Texas ---------- ---------- 12 17 25 54 6th Texas ---------- ---------- 8 24 21 53 Thompson's Station, Tenn.             March 5, 1863.             1st Texas Legion ---------- ---------- 11 59 7 77 4th Mississippi ---------- ---------- 9 37 -- 46 Chancellorsville, Va.             May 1-3, 1863.             37th North Carolina Lane's A. P. Hill's 34 193 -- 227 2d North Carolina Ramseur's D. H. Hill's 47 167 -- 214 13th North Carolina Pender's A. P. Hill's 31 178 7 216 3d North Carolina Colston's Trimble's 38 141 17 196 22d North Carolina Pender's A. P. Hill's 30 139 15 184 17th North Carolina Lane's A. P. Hill's 37 127 -- 164 4th North Carolina Ramseur's D. H. Hill's 45 110 58 213 5th Alabama Rodes's D. H. Hill's 24 130 1