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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 233 233 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 34 34 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 30 30 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 27 27 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 21 21 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 20 20 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for May 3rd, 1863 AD or search for May 3rd, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
s below. In the meantime the flag-ship Benton, and the Tuscumbia were doing their best to silence the upper battery, getting close under the guns and endeavoring to knock Batteries at Grand Gulf captured by the U. S. Mississippi Squadron, May 3, 1863. off their muzzles, when they were run out to fire. The current was so strong, however, that it was impossible to keep the two vessels in position and they sheered about very much. In one of these sheers, a shot entered the Benton's pilot hoby Port Hudson, and Admiral Porter having left Lieutenant-Commander Owen in charge at Grand Gulf with the Louisville and Tuscumbia, proceeded down the river to meet Farragut and relieve him of the command of that part of the river. On the 3d of May, 1863, Admiral Porter reached the mouth of Red River and after conferring with Admiral Farragut, proceeded up that stream with the Benton. Lafayette, Pittsburg, General Price, tug Ivy and ram Switzerland. Meeting two of Admiral Farragut's vessels,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
f gun-boats under Admiral Porter to pass up to Alexandria without firing a gun. The Army reached Alexandria the 9th of May (1863), in the evening, the Navy having reached there the morning of the same day. The enemy continued his retreat in the direction of Shreveport. The facts of the case are as follows, unimportant as they may be: After landing General Grant's troops fifteen miles below Grand Gulf, taking possession of that place and removing all the guns, the Admiral left at noon, May 3, 1863, and arrived that evening at the mouth of the Red River, and communicated with Admiral Farragut. He had with him the gun-boats Benton, Lafayette, Pittsburg, Price, ram Switzerland, and tug Ivy. Admiral Farragut informed Porter that, hearing that General Banks proposed marching on Alexandria, he had sent the Ansonia and Estrella, under Lieutenant-Commander A. P. Cooke, up Red River, to try and communicate with the General, but he feared, as they were light vessels, they might fail. On