Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for May 8th, 1863 AD or search for May 8th, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
him. On the next day they had come up to within four miles of him, and were pressing him hard. General Morgan then sent Colonel Adam R. Johnson's Regiment (10th Kentucky Cavalry) to Colonel Chenault's relief, and a few days later General Bragg sent Palmer's Brigade also, and all these constituted so strong a force as to save the situation. One of the hottest little fights that Morgan's command ever engaged in was that at Greasy Creek (sometimes called Horse-Shoe Bend) in Wayne County, on May 8 and 9, 1863. On account of the fact that the 11th Kentucky Cavalry bore the brunt of this battle, as well as for the reason that Colonel Chenault's report on it is the only one of his offiical reports I have been able to find, it is here given in full, viz: in the field, May 12, 1863. Sir,—In accordance with your order, I have the honor to report that on Saturday last I moved my regiment from Wolf River early in the morning, in the direction of Greasy Creek, on the Cumberland. When n
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of the companies. (search)
of this company, covering the period from September 10, 1862, to April 30, 1863, as follows: Captains—Joseph Chenault, killed at battle of Grassy Creek, Ky., May 8, 1863; Alexander H. Tribble, killed at Green River Bridge, July 4, 1863. First lieutenant, Isham A. Fox; second lieutenants, Charles Stone, Dudley Tribble, Jr. e company known to be in existence, and this is supposed to be 15 or 20 names short: Captain—Andrew Jackson Bruner, wounded at the foot of Greasy Creek, Ky., May 8, 1863. Some weeks later, when the command started on the Ohio raid, his wound was unhealed, and he unable to ride astride on account of it, but unwilling to be left rgeants—First, E. C. Elliott; second, W. M. Newby; third, Sidney Knatzer; fourth, Milford Jackson. Corporals—First, John McClay, killed at Greasy Creek, Ky., May 8, 1863; third, Thomas Smarr; fourth, Reuben Munday, captured at Springfield, Ky., December 30, 1862. Privates—Lewis Ashcraft, Jacob Alexander, Philip Breakhill,