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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 67 67 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 24 24 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 8 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 4 4 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June 17th, 1863 AD or search for June 17th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
Savannah soon after the capture of Port Royal. She had since been closely watched, and finding it would be almost impossible to get out of port again as a blockade-runner, she was sold to the Confederate Government and converted into an iron-clad, supposed to be one of the best that had been built in the South. The Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers, and the Nahant, Commander John Downes, were employed blockading the Atlanta at the mouth of Wilmington River. Early in the morning of June 17th, 1863, Confederate iron-clad Atlanta, captured in Warsaw Sound. it was reported to Captain Rodgers that a Confederate iron-clad was coming down the river. The Weehawken was immediately cleared for action, the cable slipped, and the Monitor steamed slowly towards the northeast end of Warsaw Island, then turned and stood up the Sound, heading for the enemy, who came on with confidence, as if sure of victory. Two steamers followed the Confederate iron-clad, filled with people who had come do