hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 55 55 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 26 26 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for June 26th, 1863 AD or search for June 26th, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ut the capture of the Atlanta seemed to have smoothed all this away, and Admiral Dupont's friends hoped on his arrival in Washington he would be appointed to some important command where he could give the country the benefit of his talents and experience. On his retirement from the command of the squadron, Mr. Secretary Welles wrote the Admiral the following letter, which would seem to indicate that if he had ever had any feeling against Dupont he had outgrown it: Navy Department, June 26, 1863. Sir-The Department has received your several dispatches announcing the capture of the rebel ironclad steamer Fingal, alias Atlanta, and enclosing the detailed reports of Captain John Rodgers and Commander John Downes of the affair. I take occasion to express the Department's appreciation of your prompt measures to prepare for the expected appearance of the rebel iron-clad by sending off Savannah two of our own ably commanded ships, and congratulate you on the acquisition of so pow