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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 550 550 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 27 27 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for July, 1863 AD or search for July, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
s the Rappahannock, 38. another raid by Stoneman, 39, 40. National troops at Suffolk fortifications there, 41, 42. the siege of Suffolk by Longstreet, 43. Peck's defense of Suffolk Longstreet driven away services of the Army at Suffolk, 44. While a portion of the National troops were achieving important. victories on the banks. of the Lower Mississippi, See the closing chapter of volume. II. those composing the Army of the Potomac were winning an equally important victory, July, 1863. not far from the banks of the Susquehannah, We left that army in charge of General Joseph Hooker, after sad disasters at Fredericksburg, encamped near the Rappahannock; Page 497, volume II. let us now observe its movements from that time until its triumphs in the conflict at Gettysburg, between the Susquehannah and the Potomac rivers. During three months after General Hooker took command of the army, no active operations were undertaken by either party in the strife, excepting in so
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
e corps before morning. Hancock, on his way back, met his own corps under Gibbons, which Meade had sent forward, and posted it a mile and a half in the rear of Cemetery Hill. When he reached Headquarters, at nine Meade's Headquarters. in the evening, he found Meade determined to make a stand at Gettysburg. He had given orders for the whole army to concentrate there, and was about leaving for the front. Both officers rode rapidly forward, and at one o'clock on the morning of the 2d, July, 1863. Meade made his Headquarters at the house of Mrs. Lydia Leister, on the Taneytown road, a short distance in the rear of Cemetery Hill. Only the corps of Sykes and Sedgwick were then absent. the former, by a forced night march, arrived early in the morning, and the latter at two o'clock in the afternoon. Sykes was not far from Hanover, twenty-three miles distant, when ordered to advance, and Sedgwick was at Manchester, more than thirty miles distant. Lee, too, had been bringing for
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
r Morgan moved rapidly upon Lebanon, then occupied by a thin regiment, under Colonel Hanson. His demand for a surrender being refused,. the raiders tried for several hours to capture the place. Then they charged into the town, set it on fire, and captured Hanson and his men,, with a battery. In this conflict Morgan's brother was killed. At dusk, the Confederates left the ruined village, pushed rapidly northward, by way of Bardstown, in a drenching rain, and, on the evening of the 7th, July, 1863. their advance reached the Ohio, at Brandenburg, about forty miles below Louisville. Morgan had fought and plundered on his way from Lebanon, and his ranks had been swelled by Kentucky secessionists to more than four thousand men, with ten guns. The advance of Rosecrans against Bragg at about this time had prevented the co-operation of Buckner, and Morgan determined to push on into Indiana and Ohio, in an independent movement. At Brandenburg, Morgan captured two steamers The McComb
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
ise and expel from the soil of Mississippi. The commanding general confidingly relies on you to sustain his pledge, which he makes in advance, and he will be with you in the good work, even unto the end. A week later these defenders of threatened homes, and the chastisers of an insolent foe, twenty-four thousand strong, were flying over the soil of Mississippi, toward the heart of the State, in search of safety from the wrath of the invaders. Sherman had invested Jackson on the 10th, July, 1863. each flank of his army resting on the Pearl River, that runs hard by, with his cannon planted on the hills around. With a hundred of these he opened upon the doomed city on the 12th, but his scanty supply of ammunition, on account of the tardiness of his trains, would not allow him to continue the attack. In that assault General Lauman, by misapprehension of orders, pressed his troops too near the Confederate works, and in the course of a few minutes he lost five hundred men, by a galli
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
nd lively work to do. Beauregard had received re-enforcements of Georgia troops from Virginia, and these he sent to co-operate with troops on James's Island in an attempt to surprise and capture Terry and his command. At the dawn of the 16th, July, 1863. these advanced rapidly upon Terry, from near Secessionville, under General Hagood, driving in the Fifty-fourth Massachusetts, on picket duty. But Terry was never asleep in the presence of danger. His troops, with the gun-boats Pawnee, John Ark Volunteer Engineers, in A Parrott gun. which Parrott guns and heavy mortars were mounted. Besides these, he had three light batteries. Behind these works a storming party was formed, and when all was in readiness, at noon on the 18th, July, 1863. he opened a bombardment on the doomed fort. Dahlgren at the same time moved his monitors near to it, regardless of the fire from both Fort ;Sumter and Fort Wagner, and poured upon the latter a continuous fire of heavy shells. This bombardmen