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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 550 550 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 27 27 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 13 13 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for July, 1863 AD or search for July, 1863 AD in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 1: introductory and explanatory. (search)
State to the Commission amounted to $500,240.00,—making a total of eight hundred and seventy-eight thousand nine hundred and ninety-one dollars and three cents ($878,991.03). These large sums were not received from fairs and other similar appliances, but were free — will offerings made by the people of the Commonwealth in response to appeals through the newspapers and by public addresses from members and friends of the cause. On three several occasions,—after the battle of Gettysburg in July, 1863, after the battle of the Wilderness in May, 1864, and after the fall of Richmond in April, 1865,—Mr. Demond, Mr. Edward S. Tobey, and some other members of the Army Committee of the Christian Commission, sat in the Merchants' Exchange, in Boston, and received the voluntary offerings of the people. No one was asked to give; every cent received was a free gift. And the result was as follows: on the first occasion, thirty-five thousand dollars; on the second, sixty thousand dollars; and on
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
to recruit eight men, at least, to serve the town as volunteers, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow twenty-five hundred dollars for the purpose, to be used by the committee. 1865. October 21st, Voted to reimburse to citizens the money subscribed and paid by them last spring for procuring recruits to fill the quota of the town; also, voted to pay back all the money which W. L. G. Pierce, who had been drafted into the military service, has paid for war taxes on his property since July, 1863, up to the time of his discharge. 1866, March—, Voted, to pay the expenses of embalming and bringing home the body of Lieutenant Thomas J. Parker. Mr. Parker was First Lieutenant in the Twenty-Eighth Regiment Massachusetts Volunteers; and was mortally wounded in front of Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865. A great many citizens' meetings were held during the war, and the votes recorded above are little more than the embodiment in legal form of those passed at those meetings. As reg