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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 66 66 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 37 37 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 29 29 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 17 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for July 1st, 1863 AD or search for July 1st, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
upplied the inevitable waste of two years of active warfare. Placing the good arms thus lost at the moderate estimate of 100,000, we must have received from various sources 400,000 stands of infantry arms in the two years of fighting, ending July 1st, 1863. I can only estimate from memory the several sources from which this supply was derived, as follows: Good rifled arms on hand at the beginning of the war (this includes the arms in the hands of volunteer companies),25,000 New arms manufactured in the Confederacy and in private Establishments40,000 Arms received from the battle-fields and put in good order (this includes the great number of arms picked up by the soldiers)150,000 Imported from January 1st, 1862, to July 1st, 1863185,000 ——— Total400,000 This estimate does not include pistols and sabres, of which a small supply was imported. To account for the very large number obtained from the enemy (rather an under than an over estimate), it must be remembered that<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Armories and small arms. (search)
upplied the inevitable waste of two years of active warfare. Placing the good arms thus lost at the moderate estimate of 100,000, we must have received from various sources 400,000 stands of infantry arms in the two years of fighting, ending July 1st, 1863. I can only estimate from memory the several sources from which this supply was derived, as follows: Good rifled arms on hand at the beginning of the war (this includes the arms in the hands of volunteer companies),25,000 New arms manufactured in the Confederacy and in private Establishments40,000 Arms received from the battle-fields and put in good order (this includes the great number of arms picked up by the soldiers)150,000 Imported from January 1st, 1862, to July 1st, 1863185,000 ——— Total400,000 This estimate does not include pistols and sabres, of which a small supply was imported. To account for the very large number obtained from the enemy (rather an under than an over estimate), it must be remembered that<