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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for July 4th, 1863 AD or search for July 4th, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
marine brigade. energy shown by the Confederates in Vicksburg. short summary of the work accomplished before Vicksburg by the Navy. surrender of Vicksburg, July 4, 1863. meeting of the officers of the Army and Navy on board the flag-ship Black Hawk. letters from General Sherman to Admiral Porter. generous terms granted the ened fire the requiem of Vicksburg was sung by the shrieking shell, as they flew through the air carrying death and destruction all over the city. On the 4th of July, 1863, that historic day was rendered more memorable by the surrender of Vicksburg to the Federal forces after a desperate but vain resistance, in which the Confedearted and gallant soldier, that no one can help feeling pleasure when he reads it, and it is here inserted. Headquarters Expeditionary Army, Black River, July 4, 1863. Dear Admiral — No event in my life could have given me more personal pride or pleasure than to have met you to-day on the wharf at Vicksburg — a Fourth of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
et emergencies which might have unnerved many clever officers. All of Rodgers' friends and associates in the Navy felt that his honors were fairly earned, and they were worn with the modesty which distinguished him. The capture of the Atlanta was the last important event that occurred while the South Atlantic squadron was under the command of Dupont, and he was well pleased to terminate his official communications to the Navy Department with such gratifying intelligence; and on the 4th of July, 1863, at his own request, he was relieved from the command of the squadron by Rear-Admiral John A. Dahlgren. In the later communications which passed between Rear-Admiral Dupont and the Secretary of the Navy, some asperity may be observed on both sides; but the capture of the Atlanta seemed to have smoothed all this away, and Admiral Dupont's friends hoped on his arrival in Washington he would be appointed to some important command where he could give the country the benefit of his talent
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
n fire on forts Sumter and Moultrie. engineering work. Dahlgren and Gillmore differ. forts Wagner and battery Gregg evacuated. the Weehawken grounded. disastrous naval assault on Sumter. great gallantry displayed by boat-crews. Ensign Wallace's report torpedo-boat. attempts to destroy New Ironsides. praise of Dahlgren and officers. the monitors and New Ironsides contrasted. Boynton's criticisms, etc. Rear-Admiral Dahlgren succeeded Rear-Admiral DuPont, at Port Royal, on July 4th, 1863, the latter having been relieved at his own request, owing to a difference of opinion between himself and the Secretary of the Navy in regard to the operations before Charleston and the attempt to take the Confederate works with the Monitors. Dahlgren had a difficult task before him. In the first place, he had relieved an officer who maintained as high a prestige as any in the Navy, at home and abroad, for skill and bravery. The attack upon and capture of Port Royal had given DuPont
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
plies from that quarter. Farragut was engaged a part of the season with his ships below Port Hudson in bombarding that place. In these operations the Mortar vessels bore a conspicuous part, until Port Hudson fell, with Vicksburg, on the 4th of July, 1863, and the Mississippi was once more opened to the sea. The blockade of the Southern coast,within the limits of Admiral Farragut's command, had, in the main, been efficient and successful, although reverses at Galveston and Sabine Pass gave River, and the constant effective attacks on the batteries of Vicksburg, the bombardment of the city and its defences, the battle of Grand Gulf and the landing of Grant's army at Bruensburg, and the final reduction of the great stronghold on July 4th, 1863, are among the successful achievements of the Mississippi squadron in co-operation with the Army. It is simple justice to the officers and men of this squadron that their heroic exertions should receive proper credit, and we cannot better
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 58: conclusion. (search)
escape the attention of the reader how persistent were the naval officers who commanded the Western Squadron in keeping open two rivers, which were in all cases the keys to the situation. Only two important points on the seacoast had been maintained by the enemy — Charleston and Wilmington — but, though they flourished for a time, afforded great assistance to the Confederate cause, and kept up the drooping spirits of the infatuated Confederacy, the rebellion received its death-blow on July 4th, 1863. Its after-struggles were only like those of the dying lion, that for a short time exhibits his greatest strength without power to do any injury in his dying throes, no matter how much prolonged. At the end of the war the United States Government had just begun to realize its strength, and those who had the direction of its affairs might well feel proud of the great Army and Navy which stood ready, now that the intestine troubles were over, to take in hand those who had so insolently