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Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 39 39 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 24 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 21 21 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 14 14 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 13 13 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 10 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for July 4th, 1863 AD or search for July 4th, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
)May 14, 1863 Champion Hill (Miss.)May 16, 1863 Big Black River (Miss.)May 17, 1863 Vicksburg (Miss.)May 19-22, 1863 Port Hudson (La.)May 27, 1863 Hanover Junction (Pa.)June 30, 1863 Gettysburg (Pa.)July 1-3, 1863 Vicksburg (Surrendered)July 4, 1863 Helena (Ark.)July 4, 1863 Port Hudson (Surrendered)July 9, 1863 Jackson (Miss.)July 16, 1863 Fort Wagner (S. C.)July 10-18, 1863 Morgan's Great Raid (Ind. and O.)June 24 to July 26, 1863 ChickamaugaSept. 19 and 20, Campbell's Station (July 4, 1863 Port Hudson (Surrendered)July 9, 1863 Jackson (Miss.)July 16, 1863 Fort Wagner (S. C.)July 10-18, 1863 Morgan's Great Raid (Ind. and O.)June 24 to July 26, 1863 ChickamaugaSept. 19 and 20, Campbell's Station (Tenn.)Nov. 16, 1863 Knoxville (Tenn.; Besieged)Nov. 17 to Dec. 4, 1863 Lookout Mountain (Tenn.)Nov. 24, 1863 Missionary Ridge (Tenn.)Nov. 25, 1863 Olustee (Fla.)Feb. 20, 1864 Sabine Cross Roads (La.)April 8, 1864 Pleasant Hill (La.)April 9, 1864 Fort Pillow (Tenn.; Massacre at)April 12, 1864 Wilderness (Va.)May 5 and 6, Spottsylvania Court-House (Va.)May 7-12, 1864 Resaca (Ga.)May 14 and 15, Bermuda HundredMay 10, 1864 New Hope Church (Ga.)May 25, 1864 Cold Harbor (Va.)June 1-3, 1<
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Helena, battle at. (search)
Helena, battle at. There was a sharp struggle between the National and Confederate troops at Helena, Ark., on the west side of the Mississippi, on July 4, 1863. Gen. B. M. Prentiss was in command there. The Confederates in that region were under the command of General Holmes, assisted by Generals Price, Marmaduke, Fagan, Parsons, McRae, and Walker, and were the remnants of shattered armies, about 8,000 strong in effective men. The post at Helena was strongly fortified. It had a garrison of 3,000 men, supported by the gunboat Tyler. Holmes was ignorant of the real strength of Prentiss, and made a bold attack upon the works. At three o'clock in the afternoon the Confederates were repulsed at all points, and withdrew with a loss, reported by Holmes, of 20 per cent. of the entire force, or 1,636 men. Prentiss lost 250 men. The Confederate loss must have been much greater than Holmes reported, for Prentiss buried 300 of their dead left behind, and captured 1,100 men.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Porter, David Dixon 1813-1891 (search)
son of David Porter; entered the navy as midshipman, Feb. 2, 1829. He was attached to the coast survey from 1836 to 1840. Then he cruised in Brazilian waters, and served in the Naval Observatory at Washington for a while. He engaged in the war against Mexico on land and on water, and in 1861 joined the Gulf Squadron, in command of the Powhatan. He was in the expedition up the Mississippi against New Orleans in 1862, in command of twenty-one mortar-boats and several steamers. Porter did important service on the Mississippi and Red rivers in 1863-64, and was conspicuous in the siege of Vicksburg. For the latter service he was promoted rear-admiral, July 4, 1863. In 1864 he was in command of the North Atlantic blockading squadron, and rendered efficient service in the capture of Fort Fisher in January, 1865. He was made vice-admiral in July, 1866; admiral, Oct. 17, 1870; and was superintendent of the Naval Academy from 1866 to 1870. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 13, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ns July 1, and continues with the defeat of Confederates......July 2-3, 1863 Franklin Pierce, ex-President of the United States, addresses a Democratic mass-meeting at Concord, N. H., alluding to Vallandigham as a martyr of free speech......July 4, 1863 Vicksburg surrenders to General Grant......July 4, 1863 Four thousand Confederate raiders, with ten guns, under John H. Morgan, cross the Ohio River at Brandenburg, Ky., into Indiana......July 7, 1863 Port Hudson surrenders to GeneralJuly 4, 1863 Four thousand Confederate raiders, with ten guns, under John H. Morgan, cross the Ohio River at Brandenburg, Ky., into Indiana......July 7, 1863 Port Hudson surrenders to General Banks......July 8, 1863 Confederate army recrosses the Potomac at Williamsport during the night of......July 13, 1863 Draft riot in New York City......July 13-16, 1863 Repulse of the United States troops in their assault on Fort Wagner, Morris Island, S. C.......July 18, 1863 Samuel Houston dies at Huntersville, Tex., aged seventy......July 25, 1863 John J. Crittenden dies at Frankfort, Ky., aged seventy-seven......July 26, 1863 President Lincoln proclaims protection of colore
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arkansas (search)
Gens. Francis J. Herron and James G. Blunt; Confederate Gen. Thomas C. Hindman. Confederates retire during the night with a loss of 1,317. Federal loss, 1,148......Dec. 7, 1862 Arkansas Post captured with 5,000 men by the United States forces under McClernand, Sherman, and Admiral Porter......Jan. 11, 1863 Confederate Gens. T. H. Holmes and Sterling Price, with about 8,000 men, attempt to retake Helena. Gen. B. M. Prentiss, with about 4,000 men, repulses them with heavy loss......July 4, 1863 Union forces occupy Little Rock......Sept. 10, 1863 Union State convention assembles to form a new constitution......Jan. 8, 1864 Dr. Isaac Murphy provisional governor; inaugurated......Jan. 22, 1864 Constitution ratified by vote of the people......March 14, 1864 [The legislature under this constitution is not recognized by Congress.] Arkansas and Mississippi formed into the 4th Military District under Gen. Edward O. C. Ord.......1867 New constitution reported......Fe
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
y: Confederates retreat after five hours engagement......March 30. 1863 Desperate engagement at Tebb's bend of Green River, Taylor county. Two hundred of 25th Michigan Infantry, under Colonel Moore, in a strong natural fortification, are attacked by 600 of Morgan's men. When summoned to surrender, Colonel Moore declined, because the Fourth of July was not an appropriate day to surrender, and the Confederates retreated after several ineffectual attempts to storm the intrenchments......July 4, 1863 General Burnside declares martial law in Kentucky......July 31, 1863 Capt. Edward Cahill having been sent into Kentucky in December, 1863, to recruit free colored men for the Union army, the legislature by resolution protests, and requests the President to remove all camps for negro soldiers, by which our slaves are enticed to leave the service of their owners ......Feb. 18, 1864 Meeting at Louisville of a Border State freedom convention. One hundred delegates from four States—K
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Hampshire, (search)
rence seminary and female college at Tilton, opened 1845, receives its charter......1852 Property qualification for State officers abolished......1852 Franklin Pierce inaugurated President......March 4, 1853 Gold discovered at Plainfield, in the Connecticut Valley......1854 State teachers' association incorporated......1854 First regiment of Federal troops leaves Concord for the seat of war......May 25, 1861 Franklin Pierce's remarkable speech at Concord on the war ......July 4, 1863 Soldiers' voting bill, passed Aug. 17, is returned Aug. 26 with a veto, but becomes a law because retained in the governor's hands more than five days......Aug. 17, 1864 Law authorizing a commissioner to edit early provincial records, and Rev. Dr. Bouton, of Concord, chosen......1866 Office of superintendent of public instruction created......1867 Revision and codification of the laws, ordered by the legislature of 1865, completed......1867 New Hampshire College of Agricult
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vicksburg, siege of (search)
for a general assault. Pemberton lost hope. For forty-five days he had been engaged in a brave struggle, and saw nothing but submission in the end, and on the morning of July 3 he raised a white flag That afternoon Grant and Pemberton met and arranged terms of surrender, and at 10 A. M. the next day the vanquished brigades of the Confederates began to march out of the lines at Vicksburg as prisoners of war. At the same time there was a great National victory at Gettysburg (q. v.) and July 4, 1863, was the turning-point in the Civil War. In the battles from Port Gibson to Vicksburg Grant lost 9,855 men, of whom 1,223 were killed. In these engagements he had made 37,000 prisoners; and the Confederates had lost, besides, 10,000 killed and wounded, with a vast number of stragglers. Two days before the surrender a Vicksburg newspaper, printed on wallpaper, ridiculed a reported assurance of Grant that he should dine in that city on July 4, saying, Ulysses must first get Cave Liff in