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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for July 10th, 1863 AD or search for July 10th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
nce helped Army and Navy on to victory. Admiral Farragut on June 3d, 1863, recommended for promotion a young Ensign (Adams) who had commanded one of the mortar vessels (the Orvieto) at Port Hudson, at the same time calling the attention of the department to his heroism, endurance and obstinate determination to hold his ground until compelled by his commander to fall back, when his vessel was being cut to pieces. The last affair of any importance that took place in the river before July 10th, 1863, was the attack of some Confederate field batteries upon the U. S. steamer New London, Lieutenant-Commander G. H. Perkins. The New London was on her way from Port Hudson, having on board a bearer of dispatches from General Banks, announcing the unconditional surrender of that place. On his arrival at Donaldsonville, Lieutenant-Commander Perkins was directed to proceed to New Orleans, the Winona to accompany him past some batteries at Whitehall Point. At 1 o'clock, A. M., as the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
Brigadier-General Q. A. Gillmore was assigned to the command of the Department. General Gillmore commenced his advance upon Charleston by the movement of troops to Folly Island on July 3d, 1863, where they remained concealed as much as possible, and erected batteries to command those of the enemy on the south end of Morris Island. With the foregoing explanations, we will proceed to relate what followed, namely, the attack on the enemy's works by the Army and Navy. At 4 A. M. of July 10th, 1863, four iron-clads — the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers, Montauk, Commander Donald McN. Fairfax, Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Weehawken, Commander E. R. Colhoun, passed over the bar, the flag of Rear-Admiral Dahlgren flying on the Catskill. One hour later, at 5 A. M., General Gillmore made an attack on the Confederate fortified positions on the south end of Morris Island, and after an engagement of three hours and a quarter he had captured all the enemy's works upon that