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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for July 16th, 1863 AD or search for July 16th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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ains of its being slighted by historians. (See Putnam's Rebellion Record, V, 209-211; XII, 494-504.) Resulted in disastrous defeat. (Crowninshield's 1st Mass. Cavalry, p. 62.) as an inexcusable blunder from beginning to end. They had to advance upon a narrow ridge of land not over two hundred yards wide, swept by grape and canister from six cannon . . . and exposed to a murderous fire from riflepits and sharpshooters. The 54th Mass. was under fire for the first time at James Island, July 16, 1863, aiding to repel an attack made by Confederate troops upon the 10th Connecticut, and behaved so well as to be complimented in orders by General Terry, who praised the steadiness and soldierly conduct of the 54th Mass., who were on duty at the outposts on the right and met the brunt of the attack. Emilio's 54th Mass., p. 63, fully describes this affair. General Seymour also speaks of the 54th as having conducted itself commendably a few days previously on James Island. (Official War