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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 117 117 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 29 29 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for July 18th, 1863 AD or search for July 18th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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verted into a mere rivulet of water amid vast stretches of mud. They reached Cole's Island at 5 A. M.; they had scarcely any rations left and very little fresh water. In the evening they embarked on another steamer by means of a leaky long-boat holding but thirty,—so that they were all night in the embarkation. They reached Folly Island at 7 A. M., still without rations. Marching six miles, they waited for transportation across Light House Inlet, landing at Folly Island about 5 P. M., July 18, 1863. In this condition, the regiment being thus exhausted and still without food, their commander was asked by General Strong if he would lead the column of attack on what was called the strongest single earthwork known in the history of warfare. It mounted eighteen guns and was garrisoned by seven hundred men. (Emilio, p. 170.) The Confederate authorities claimed for it, on the other hand, that no fort was ever so strongly attacked. (Southern Historical Society Papers.) For the best des