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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 451 451 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for August, 1863 AD or search for August, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Among those who succumbed to the deadly malaria of the Vicksburg camps, was General Welsh, who, soon after, went home to die. The corps left Mississippi in August, 1863, and returned to Kentucky, where, after a short rest, it joined in Burnside's advance into East Tennessee, a movement which had already been commenced. The twmporarily attached to the Thirteenth. Upon the evacuation of Jackson and retreat of the enemy, the corps returned to Vicksburg, and in the following month, (August, 1863) moved on transports down the Mississippi to New Orleans. The troops were assigned to duty at various places in the Department of the Gulf,--in Texas and Loui and finally assaulted by Longstreet, but without success. At Campbell's Station, and at Knoxville, the corps was commanded by General Mahlon D. Manson. In August, 1863, Mahan's Brigade of Indiana troops was assigned to the Third Division. These regiments were recruited for six months service only, and returned to Indiana in
additional companies which became necessary by reason of the change were recruited, Company L joining the regiment in August, 1863, and Company M in January, 1864. The Seventh remained on garrison duty in various forts near Washington until May 15,y's Division — the regiment marched up the Peninsula on a campaign memorable for the heat and long, rapid marches. In August, 1863, it went to Folly Island, S. C., taking part in the operations about Charleston Harbor; then, on February 23, 1864, sat Gettysburg — in Ames's Brigade, Barlow's Division, Eleventh Corps--it lost 9 killed, 100 wounded, and 75 missing. In August, 1863, this division of the Eleventh Corps was detached, and ordered to Charleston Harbor, S. C. While stationed at Hilton Heffecting an entrance, engaged in a hand-to-hand fight, from which the sergeant and only one man returned alive. In August, 1863, the division (Washburne's) moved to New Orleans, and the regiment served in that department during the ensuing twelve
aplain, died of disease at Key West, Fla., in the summer of 1864. There is no satisfactory explanation for the surprising mortality in the 5th Colored Heavy Artillery, and 65th Colored Infantry. The former regiment was recruited in Louisiana and Mississippi, and was stationed along the Mississippi river at various points between Memphis and Port Hudson. The most of the deaths were caused by fevers; and at one time the regiment suffered from small pox. It was organized at Vicksburg in August, 1863, and was mustered out May 20, 1866. Its original designation was the 9th Louisiana Vols., A. D. The 65th Colored Infantry was also stationed along the Mississippi. It was recruited in Missouri, and organized at Benton Barracks, Mo., in December, 1863, as the 2nd Missouri Vols., A. D. Over 100 men died at the Barracks before the regiment took the field, the men having been enlisted by the Provost-Marshals throughout the State and forwarded to this Post during an inclement season,--thi