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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 451 451 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army. You can also browse the collection for August, 1863 AD or search for August, 1863 AD in all documents.

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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 2: influence of Christian officers. (search)
eir evil designs, and that He will graciously restore to our country the blessings of peace and security. He announced the victory at Winchester in the following dispatch: To His Excellency, Jefferson Davis: June 15, 1863.—God has again crowned the valor of our troops with success. Early's Division stormed the enemy's intrenchments at Winchester, capturing their artillery, etc. R. E. Lee. His order requiring the observance of the fast-day appointed by President Davis in August, 1863, was as follows: General order no. 83. Headquarters, A. N. Va., August 13, 1863. The President of the Confederate States has, in the name of the people, appointed the 21st day of August as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer. A strict observance of the day is enjoined upon the officers and soldiers of this army. All military duties, except such as are absolutely necessary, will be suspended. The commanding officers of brigades and regiments are requested to cause divine se
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 8: eagerness of the soldiers to hear the Gospel. (search)
any as 200, to ask an interest in the prayers of God's people, or profess their faith in Jesus. There were over 500 professions of conversion in these meetings at Fredericksburg, and the good work extended out into the neighboring brigades, and went graciously on—only temporarily interrupted by the battle of Chancellorsville—until we took up the line of march for Gettysburg. Indeed, it did not cease even on that active campaign, but culminated in the great revival along the Rapidan in August, 1863, which reached nearly the whole army, and really did not cease until the surrender at Appomattox. On Sunday evening, September 6, 1863, I had an engagement to preach for Brother J. J. D. Renfroe, chaplain of the Tenth Alabama, in the great revival in Wilcox's Brigade, camped near the Rapidan, not far from Orange Court House. As further illustrating the character of our world, I may mention that I preached to a large congregation in my own brigade at 6 o'clock that morning. At II o'c
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 13: results of the work and proofs of its genuineness (search)
owing estimate of the number of men in the Army of Northern Virginia who professed faith in Christ during the four years of its existence. During the fall and winter of 1862-63, and spring of 1863, there were at least 1,500 professions. From August, 1863, to the 1st of January, 1864, at least 5,000 found peace in believing. From January, 1864, to the opening of the Wilderness campaign, at least 2,000 more were added to this number. And from May, 1864, to April, 1865, it is a low estimate to debted to you for baptizing in the army the best and most efficient men in my Church. I had a tender meeting several years ago with a delegate from Texas to the Southern Baptist Convention at Baltimore, whom I had baptized on the Rapidan in August, 1863, and I might give a number of touching incidents concerning these men whom I meet all over the South. In the summer of 1865 I was travelling one day along a country road in Virginia, when I saw a young man plowing in the field, guiding the
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix: letters from our army workers. (search)
meet to worship, having only the dim candle-light; hundreds would be there. When an invitation was given for prayers there would come so many I knew not what to do with them. At this time Brother Barrett was at home, but Brother Moore was present. I did all of the preaching that I could. At this time kept my command supplied with tracts, papers, etc. In August and September I spent some time with General Walker's Virginia Brigade, where souls were being converted. On one occasion, in August, 1863, I went down to Rapidan river with Brother Anderson, chaplain in General Walker's Virginia Brigade, to baptize. We met about 2,000 soldiers, besides many citizens. He (Brother Anderson) went down into the water and baptized twelve. After he came out I opened service in our usual way by singing and prayer. Such music I never before heard. It sounded as though the heavenly host had come down to take part in our earthly worship. I went down into the water and baptized twenty-three. Th
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Appendix no. 2: the work of grace in other armies of the Confederacy. (search)
., and he made a profound impression. Colonel Reed was announced for afternoon service and Dr. Palmer for night, but lo! the Long roll at 2 P. M., and our brigade was on the march, manoeuvre, picket, or battle line for four weeks before we could encamp near the same place in quiet again. And they were memorable weeks of dust, conflict, carnage, and death to thousands of both armies. I have no record of the extent of the revival in the Army of Tennessee around Chattanooga in July and August, 1863. I have no doubt that it was general, as chaplains and missionaries were all busy so far as I can recall. August 24. Visited the sick at Ringgold, and then to Catoosa Springs, where there were a large number of convalescents, the most pleasant place for the sick to rest and recuperate that I have seen. I preached to them day and night during my stay, and there were penitents, professions, and profuse praise by the pardoned and happy Christian soldiers. Then I was at Spring Place, D