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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 21 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for September 8th, 1863 AD or search for September 8th, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 31: operations of Farragut's vessels on the coast of Texas, etc. (search)
make the first attack alone, led by Lieutenant Crocker, assisted by 180 sharp-shooters divided amongst the vessels, and after driving the enemy from his defences and destroying or driving off the rams, the transports were to advance and land the troops. In all, these vessels carried twenty-seven guns, which one would suppose was enough to dispose of the few guns the enemy had mounted. The attack, which was to have been a surprise at early dawn, was not made until 3 P. M. on the 8th of September, 1863, twenty-eight hours after the expedition had appeared off the Sabine. A reconnaissance had been made in the morning by Generals Franklin and Weitzel and Lieutenant Crocker. when they decided on a plan of attack. Commodore Bell had sent two good pilots down in the Granite City. At 3 P. M. the transports were over the bar, the Granite City leading them in, for the purpose of covering the landing of the troops The Clifton, Sachem and Arizona engaged a battery of seven guns. A
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 36: operations of the South Atlantic Squadron under Rear-Admiral Dahlgren, 1863.--operations in Charleston harbor, etc. (search)
ergy of the commander-in-chief and his officers; but in the work accomplished there was the strongest endorsement of Rear-Admiral DuPont and of the views of his officers — that the naval force was not strong enough to contend successfully with the well-built and formidable forts included in the great circle of fire, to say nothing of the submarine and other obstructions barring the way to Charleston. With all Dahlgren's incessant fighting, from the time of his first attack to the 8th of September, 1863, he had not advanced beyond the line whence DuPont had engaged the batteries on the 7th of April previously. True, some of the Confederate force had been broken in the fall of Wagner and Gregg, but only after the junction of Gillmore's sixty guns with those of the ironclads in cross-fire. It was the same result that obtained on the Western rivers, success always attended a hearty co-operation between the military and naval forces, and failure as surely met the single-handed siege o