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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 15 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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ive batteries. trooper. Another account. The following private letter from one who accompanied the Second New-York cavalry in the advance upon Culpeper, gives the following particulars of the skirmishing: near Rapidan River, Va., Monday, Sept. 14, 1863. Kilpatrick's division moved Saturday morning. We arrived at Kelly's Ford in the evening, and lay by our horses in marching order during the night. Between three and four there came up one of the most drenching showers I ever experienght on Stony Mountain, in a drenching shower of rain, and slept soundly on the wet ground. Doctor Kingston, our surgeon, showed himself a brave and skilful man, and our wounded got the best of attention. A rebel narrative. Richmond, Sept. 14, 1863. The following is an accurate statement of what transpired in Culpeper. About three o'clock on Sunday morning information was conveyed to the cavalry — that the enemy were preparing to cross at Stark's Ford, some eight miles above our for
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. The composition, losses, and strength of each army as here stated give the gist of all the data obtainable in the Official Records. K stands for killed; w for wounded; m w for mortally wounded; m for captured or missing ; c for captured. Prairie Grove, December 7th, 1862. Union: army of the Frontier.--Brig.-Gen. James G. Hunt. First division, Brig.-Gen. James G. Blunt. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frederick eans's Regiment,----; Mo. Battery (Bledsoe's),----. Brigade loss: k, 8; w, 45; m, 1=54. Total Confederate loss: killed, 173; wounded, 687; captured or missing, 776 = 1636. Effective strength, 7646. Little Rock expedition, August 1st-September 14th, 1863. The Union army.--Maj.-Gen. Frederick Steele. Escort: D, 3d Ill. Cav., Lieutenant James K. McLean; Kane County (Ill.) Cav., Lieutenant Eben C. Litherland. First (cavalry) division, Brig.-Gen. John W. Davidson. First Brigade, Co
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
onroe, saying trains of cars had been heard running night and day for thirty-six hours on the Petersburg and Richmond railway, indicating the movement of troops; and the General-in-Chief was inclined to believe that a movement against Norfolk, similar to that in the spring, See page 41. was about to be made in favor of Lee, the Confederates hoping thereby to draw off some of the troops from Meade. But this suspicion was dispelled by another dispatch from General Foster the next day, Sept. 14, 1863. bearing a report that Longstreet's corps was passing southward into North Carolina. Then Halleck directed Meade to ascertain the truth or falsity of the latter report, when it was found to be true, as we have observed. See page 101. Meanwhile Halleck had ordered Burnside to move down and connect with Rosecrans, and directed General Hurlbut, at Memphis, to send all of his available force to Corinth and Tuscumbia, to operate against Bragg, should he attempt the anticipated flank movem
Va., April 3, 1865 6 Jones's Cross Roads, Va., July 10, ‘63 2 Ream's Station, Va., June 29, 1864 4 Appomattox, Va., April 8, 1865 2 Brandy Station, Va., Sept. 14, 1863 1 Charlestown, W. Va., Aug. 22, 1864 2 On Picket and at Places Unknown 3 Present, also, at many other engagements in which it lost men wounded or capturNov. 28, 1864 6 Shelbyville Road, Tenn. 1 Louisville, Ga., Dec. 1, 1864 2 Middleton, Tenn., June 30, 1863 1 Sherman's March, Ga. 3 Winchester, Tenn., Sept. 14, 1863 1 Rockingham, N. C., March 7, 1865 2 Chickamauga, Ga. 14 Fayetteville, N. C., March 9, 1865 1 Fairburn, Ga., Aug. 19, 1864 2 Averasboro, N. C., March 16 Charlestown, Va., March 7 1862 1 Falling Waters Md., July 14, 1863 2 Trevilian Sta'n, Va., June 12, 1864 17 Middletown Va., March 24, 1862 1 Rapidan Va., Sept. 14, 1863 1 Winchester, Va., Aug. 11, 1864 2 Salem, Va., April 1, 1862 1 Robertson's River, Sept. 23, 1863 1 Front Royal, Va., Aug. 16, 1864 4 Piedmont, Va., Apri
ent. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-Gen. Grant, or Major-Gen. Sherman, Vicksburgh. On the fourteenth, the following telegrams were sent to Generals Foster, Burnside, and Hurlbut: Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Sept. 14, 1863. Information received here indicates that part of Lee's forces have gone to Petersburgh. There are various suppositions for this. Some think it is intended to put down Union feeling in North-Carolina; others, to make an attempt to capturight with all possible despatch. Communicate with Sherman to assist you, and hurry forward reenforcements as previously directed. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. Headquarters of the army, Washington, D. C., Sept. 14, 1863. There are reasons why you should reenforce General Rosencrans with all possible despatch. It is believed that the enemy will concentrate to give him battle, and you must be there to help him. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Major-Gener
ram: Come back immediately; cannot get along without you; not a wheel moving on any of the roads. General Haupt returned, and the wheels began to move. On September 14, 1863, D. C. McCallum succeeded Haupt. of the Federal Army of Virginia and the Army of the Potomac were, until September 9, 1863, largely in the hands of Herman ammunition; fourth, hospital stores; fifth, infantry regiments that had seen Major-General D. C. McCallum: an officer praised by General Grant On September 14, 1863, General Haupt was relieved from further duty in the War Department, and turned over his duties to Colonel (later Major-General) D. C. McCallum, who was apptions were kept open, the wounded handled with celerity, and after the battle there was a sufficient supply on hand of nearly all kinds of provisions. On September 14, 1863, General Haupt was relieved from further duty in the War Department, and turned over his work to Colonel D. C. McCallum, who was appointed superintendent of
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
ner, Sept. 10, 1863. Perry, Ed. A., Aug. 28, 1862. Perry, Wm. F., Feb. 21, 1865. Pettigrew, J. J., Feb. 26, 1862. Pettus, E. W., Sept. 18, 1863. Pike, Albert, Aug. 15, 1861. Pillow, Gideon J., July 9, 1861. Polk, Lucius E., Dec. 13, 1862. Preston, William, April 14, 1862. Pryor, Roger A., April 16, 1862. Quarles, Wm. A., Aug. 25, 1863. Rains, G. J., Sept. 23, 1861. Rains, James E., Nov. 4, 1862. Randolph, G. W., Feb. 12, 1862. Ransom, M. W., June 13, 1863. Reynolds, A. W., Sept. 14, 1863. Richardson, R. V., Dec. 1, 1863. Ripley, Roswell S., Aug. 15, 1861. Roberts, Wm. P., Feb. 21, 1865. Robertson, B. H., June 9, 1862. Robertson, J. B., Nov. 1, 1862. Roddy, Philip D., Aug. 3, 1863. Roane, John S., Nov. 20, 1862. Ross, Lawrence S., Dec. 21, 1863. Ruggles, Daniel, Aug. 9, 1861. Rust, Albert, Mar. 4, 1862. Scales, Alfred M., June 3, 1863. Scott, T. M., May 10, 1864. Scurry, Wm. R., Sept. 12, 1862. Sears, Claudius W., Mar. 1, 1864. Semmes, Paul J., Mar. 11, 186
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 6: (search)
shington, D. C., September 13, 1863. Major-General Grant or Vicksburg. Major-General Sherman, It is quite possible that Bragg and Johnston will move through Northern Alabama to the Tennessee River to turn General Rosecrans' right and cut off his communication. All of General Grant's available forces should be sent to Memphis, thence to Corinth and Tuscumbia, to cooperate with Rosecrans, should the rebels attempt that movement. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. War Department, September 14, 1863. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. There are good reasons why troops should be sent to assist General Rosecrans' right wing with all possible dispatch. Communicate with Sherman to assist you, and hurry forward reenforcements as previously directed. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. War Department, September 15, 1863. Major-General Hurlbut, Memphis. All troops that can possibly be spared in Western Tennessee and on the Mississippi River should be sent without delay to assist
tain they were converted into ships of war and put into commission by the authority of the Confederate government. The government of the United States asserted that they were built in the ports of Great Britain, and thereby her duty of neutrality was violated, and the government made responsible for the damages sustained by private citizens of the United States in consequence of her captures on the seas. To this declaration of Adams, Earl Russell (he had been made an earl) replied on September 14, 1863, thus: When the United States Government assumes to hold the Government of Great Britain responsible for the captures made by vessels which may be fitted out as vessels of war in a foreign port, because such vessels were originally built in a British port, I have to observe that such pretentions are entirely at variance with the principles of international law, and with the decisions of American courts of the highest authority; and I have only, in conclusion, to express my hope th
. You will please give your immediate attention to the organization of the water transportation and harbor police, and ascertain from Captain Tucker how far he may be able to assist, or whether he would prefer superintending the organization himself. Of course the two—transportation and harbor police—should be under the control of the same head. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Chief of Staff. Headquarters, Department S. C., Ga., and Fla., Charleston, S. C., Sept. 14th, 1863. Brig.-General R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., etc., etc.: General,—I am instructed by the Commanding General to ask you the following questions, and direct the execution of the following orders: 1st. Are the roads and bridges from Fort Pemberton, along the Stono, to the upper batteries near the Overflow in good condition? If not, they should at once be so made. All those batteries and those in rear of the Overflow must be connected, as soon as practicable, by a good wag<
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