Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for October 17th, 1863 AD or search for October 17th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
d on the 25th of April, the town voted to raise the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each and every one of its quota called for by the President, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864; and that the sum be expended in refunding money paid by individual subscription, in procuring this town's proportion of troops called for atwas held on the 9th of April, at which seventy-eight hundred dollars were appropriated to fill the quotas of the town under the calls of the President for men, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. Mr. Colly, the town-clerk, writes:— I have sent you all the votes of importance relating to the war. Many other votes were passed, anir compensation. 1864. February 4th, Voted, to allow town aid to the dependants of volunteers who have enlisted in our town under the call of the President, Oct. 17, 1863, in amount to what is received by them for State aid; also to the widows, like town aid. This vote was in effect to give aid to the families of volunteers i
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
undred and twenty-five dollars be paid to each person; and to each citizen or resident of the town who enlisted since Oct. 17, 1863, who had received a less sum than others, be paid seventy-five dollars. July 30th, The selectmen were authorized to bve dollars to each volunteer who should enlist to fill the quota of the town, under the call of the President, issued Oct. 17, 1863, excepting those who have already received a gratuity from individuals. The selectmen were authorized to borrow moneby taxation, for the purpose of procuring the quota of volunteers called for from the town of Norton by the President Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and for paying and refunding money which has already been paid and contributed in aid of and for tB. Horton, Nelson Goff, and M. R. Randall were chosen to furnish the town's quota under a call of the President dated Oct. 17, 1863, and said committee was authorized to borrow a sufficient sum of money for that purpose. 1864. At a special meetin
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
2d, It was voted to pay to each of the forty-seven volunteers required to fill the quota of the town two hundred dollars in addition to that already voted, and to discontinue the payment of all bounties after the 9th of the present month. August 19th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred and fifty dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, when mustered in and credited to the town. 1863. November 2d, Voted, to fill the quota of the town under the call of the President dated Oct. 17, 1863; and to pay the families of men who may be drafted the same State aid that is paid to the families of volunteers. 1864. May 20th, The bounty to volunteers for three years service was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, to be paid to each enlisted man when mustered in and credited to the quota of the town. Charles E. Goss and Eben Sawyer were chosen to assist the selectmen in the recruiting of men and the payment of bounties. A series of resolutions were read and adopted by
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 8: Hampden County. (search)
was authorized to be paid to volunteers for nine months service. 1863. September 21st, Voted, to raise twenty-nine hundred and five dollars and eighty-four cents, in obedience to a law passed April 29, 1863, entitled an act for the reimbursement of bounties paid to volunteers. 1864. April 4th, Five hundred dollars were appropriated for aid to soldiers' families. Two thousand two hundred and sixty dollars were raised for reimbursement of money paid by citizens to volunteers since Oct. 17, 1863. July 15th, The bounty to be paid volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. 1865. April 3d, The selectmen were authorized to borrow money to refund to individuals the amounts of money they had voluntarily contributed to aid recruiting, and to those who had furnished substitutes for the army. Agawam furnished one hundred and seventy-two men for the war, which was a surplus of ten over and above all demands. Four were comm
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 9: Hampshire County. (search)
thousand men, to take the field and uphold the Constitution. August 30th, Voted to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each volunteer for nine months service, who shall enlist and be credited to the quota of the town, and the treasurer was authorized to borrow money for that purpose. 1864. April 18th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding four thousand six hundred and twenty-five dollars to pay citizens who had contributed money for the payment of bounties since Oct. 17, 1863; also to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer who had enlisted to fill the quota of the town since Feb. 6, 1864, by reenlist-ment from old regiments. July 30th, Fifty-five hundred dollars were appropriated to pay the forty-four men the town is called upon to furnish. 1865. March 6th, The treasurer was authorized to borrow not exceeding twelve thousand dollars for State aid to soldiers' families, or the payment of the town debt. May 10th, Voted to app
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
63. December 7th, The selectmen were authorized to use all legal and proper means to fill the town's quota, in compliance with the call of the President, dated Oct. 17, 1863, for three hundred thousand men. 1864. June 4th, Voted, to raise a sufficient amount of money to pay a bounty of one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each April 4th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to twenty-five men to fill the contingent of the town under the calls of the President of Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. July 30th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. s during the year. November 3d, A committee of nine was appointed to aid the selectmen in filling the quota of the town under the call of the President, dated Oct. 17, 1863; and to petition the Governor, if they think it expedient, to call an extra session of the Legislature to pass laws giving towns power to aid in enlisting men.
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
64. April 4th, The bounty was raised to one hundred and twenty-five dollars to each volunteer for three years service. April 20th, Voted, to refund to citizens the money paid by them to furnish recruits under the call of the President dated October 17, 1863, not to exceed one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each recruit furnished by them. Two other war meetings were held during the year. Recruiting continued until the end of the contest. 1865. April 4th, Money was appropriated to pay ao have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in relation to the war. 1864. April 4th, Voted, to raise a sum equal to one hundred dollars per man of the quotas of this town under the orders of the President dated Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and that from the money so raised there be refunded to each individual, who has contributed and paid any sum in aid of or for the purpose of obtaining the town's quotas under the said calls, the amount so contributed and pa