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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 192 192 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for November, 1863 AD or search for November, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
sand. Fortunately for Lee, Meade, whose army was all on the south side of the Rappahannock on the morning of the 8th, Nov., 1863. did not immediately advance, and, under cover of the darkness that night, the Confederates withdrew beyond the Rapid Afor the Army of the Potomac. Meade lay quietly between the Rappahannock and the Rapid Anna until late in the month, Nov., 1863. watching for a favorable opportunity to advance on his foe. It might have been more prudent for him to have gone into ook the risk. Providing his troops with ten days rations, he moved forward at six o'clock on the morning of the 26th, Nov., 1863. leaving his trains parked at Richardsville, on the north side of the Rapid Anna. The plan of advance was for the corpnt of all was a strong abatis, made of a thick growth of pines. Sykes's corps coming up on the morning of the 28th, Nov., 1863. Meade had his army then all in hand along a line not much exceeding five or six miles in length. Gregg was sent out t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
e assault was about one hundred. Longstreet had promised his soldiers that they should dine in Knoxville that day; but they were otherwise engaged, in burying their dead outside of its defenses, by permission of General Burnside, who lent them ambulances to remove the bodies of their comrades within the Confederate lines. While Burnside was thus resisting Longstreet, heavy columns were, moving to assist him. So soon as he was assured of victory at Chattanooga, on the night of the 25th, Nov. 1863. General Grant ordered General Granger, with his own (Fourth) corps, and detachments from others, twenty thousand strong, to re-enforce Burnside. Sherman was ordered in the same direction, so as to make the business of relief surely successful, and on the night of the 30th he was at Charleston, where the East Tennessee and Georgia railway crosses the Hiawassee River. There was also Howard, Davis, and Blair, who had concentrated at Cleveland the day before; and there Sherman received orde