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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 192 192 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for November, 1863 AD or search for November, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 7 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
to Nov. 1845 Joshua L. MartinNov. 1845 to Nov. 1847 Reuben ChapmanNov. 1847 to Nov. 1849 Henry Watkins CollierNov. 1849 to Nov. 1853 John A. WinstonNov. 1853 to Nov. 1857 Andrew B. MooreNov. 1857 to Nov. 1861 John Gill ShorterNov. 1861 to Nov. 1863 Thomas H. WattsNov. 1863 to Apr. 1865 Interregnum of two months. Lewis E. ParsonsJune. 1865 to Dec. 1865 Robt. M. PattonDec. 1865 to July, 1868 Wm. H. SmithJuly, 1868 to Nov. 1870 Robt. B. LindsayNov. 1870 to Nov. 1872 David B. LewisNovNov. 1863 to Apr. 1865 Interregnum of two months. Lewis E. ParsonsJune. 1865 to Dec. 1865 Robt. M. PattonDec. 1865 to July, 1868 Wm. H. SmithJuly, 1868 to Nov. 1870 Robt. B. LindsayNov. 1870 to Nov. 1872 David B. LewisNov. 1872 to Nov. 1874 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1874 to Nov. 1876 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1876 to Nov. 1878 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1878 to Nov. 1880 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1880 to Nov. 1882 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1882 to Nov. 1884 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1884 to Nov. 1886 Thomas SeayNov. 1886 to Nov. 1888 Thomas SeayNov. 1888 to Nov. 1890 Thomas G. JonesNov. 1890 to Nov. 1892 Thomas G. JonesNov. 1892 to Nov. 1894 William C. OatesNov. 1894 to Nov. 1896 Joseph F. JohnstonNov. 1896 to Nov. 1898 Joseph F. Johnst
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Granger, Gordon 1821-1876 (search)
Granger, Gordon 1821-1876 Military officer; born in New York City, in 1821; graduated at West Point in 1845; served in the war with Mexico, and was made captain of cavalry in May, 1861. He served under Halleck and Grant in the West, and was made major-general of volunteers, Sept. 17, 1862. He commanded the district of Central Kentucky, was put in command of the 4th Army Corps after the battle of Chickamauga, was engaged in the struggle on Missionary Ridge, November, 1863, and was active in the military movements that led to the capture of Mobile in 1864, for which he was brevetted major-general of the United States army. He was mustered out of the volunteer service in 1866; was promoted to colonel in the regular army the same year; and died in Santa Fe, N. M., Jan. 10, 1876.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lookout Mountain, battle on (search)
Lookout Mountain, battle on Gen. W. T. Sherman arrived near Chattanooga Top of Lookout Mountain, sunrise, November 25, 1863. late in November, 1863. It was important to get his army over the river without being discovered. To attract the chief attention of the Confederates in another quarter, Hooker was ordered to attack them on the northern face of Lookout Mountain. His entire force consisted of nearly 10,000 men. The main Confederate force was encamped in a hollow half-way up the mountain, and the summit was held by several brigades. Their pickets held a continuous line along Lookout Creek, with reserves in the valley. Hooker moved to the attack on the morning of Nov. 24. Geary, supported by Cruft, marched to Wauhatchie and crossed Lookout Creek there, while the rest of the troops crossed in front of the Confederates on temporary bridges. A heavy mist enveloped mountain and plain. Geary crossed at eight o'clock, seized a picket-guard of forty men, and extended his lin
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mine Run, operations near (search)
Mine Run, operations near Early in November, 1863, General Lee was preparing to go into winter quarters near Culpeper Court-house when the National victory at Rappahannock Station and the crossing of that stream by Meade, Nov. 8, caused him, under cover of darkness, to withdraw beyond the Rapidan, and intrench his army on Mine Run and its vicinity, a strong defensive position. Meade lay quietly between the Rappahannock and Rapidan, until late in November, when, his communications being perfect with his supplies and the capital, he undertook a bold movement. He proceeded to attempt to turn the right of the Confederates, and, sweeping round towards Orange Court-house, overwhelm Ewell, turn the works on Mine Run, and effect a lodgment at Orange and Gordonsville. This would involve the perilous measure of cutting loose from his supplies, but he took the risk. He left his trains parked at Richardsville, on the north side of the Rapidan, and moved on the morning of Nov. 26; but inst
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Rogersville, surprise at (search)
Rogersville, surprise at In November, 1863, Colonel Garrard, of General Shackleford's command, with two regiments and a battery, was posted at Rogersville, in east Tennessee, and there was suddenly attacked on the 6th by Confederates under Gen. W. E. Jones, about 2,000 in number. It was a surprise. The Nationals were routed, with a loss of 750 men, four guns, and thirty-six wagons. This disaster created great alarm. Shackleford's troops at Jonesboro and Greenville fled in haste back to Bull's Gap, and the Confederates, not doubting Shackleford's horsemen would be after them in great force, fled as hastily towards Virginia, in the opposite direction.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), State of Tennessee, (search)
illed and wounded. Early in April, Gen. Gordon Granger was in command at Franklin, building a fort near. He had about 5,000 troops. Van Dorn attacked him there (April 10) with 9,000 Confederates. The latter intended if successful to push on and seize Nashville, but he was repulsed with a loss of about 300 men. Rosecrans sent Col. Abdel D. Streight (q. v.) on an extensive raid in Alabama and Georgia in April and May, which resulted in the capture of the leader and his men. Late in November, 1863, Gen. Sherman (q. v.) arrived in the neighborhood of Chattanooga. It was imperative that he should get his army over the river without being discovered. To draw the attention of the Confederates to another quarter, Hooker was ordered to engage them on the northern side of Lookout Mountain. His entire force consisted of approximately 10,000 men. The main Confederate force was encamped in a hollow half-way up the mountain, the summit of which was held by several brigades. Hooker began
th threatens Cincinnati......Sept. 6, 7, 1862 Ohio State University founded......1862 Clement L. Vallandigham arrested by General Burnside......May 5, 1863 Democratic convention nominates Clement L. Vallandigham for governor......June 11, 1863 Confederate Gen. John H. Morgan, with cavalry, crosses the Ohio on a raid through Indiana and Ohio......July 3, 1863 Captured with most of his command at New Lisbon......July 26, 1863 Confined in Ohio penitentiary, he escapes......November, 1863 Soldiers' monument erected at Cincinnati......1864 Number of men, reduced to a threeyears' standard, furnished by Ohio for the Civil War, 240,514, from April 15, 1861, to......April 9, 1865 University of Wooster established at Wooster......1866 Cincinnati suspension bridge opened to the public......1867 Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College, State control, opened at Columbus......1870 Cincinnati University opened at Cincinnati......1870 Population, 2,665,260; 65