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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 192 192 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 22 22 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 8 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for November, 1863 AD or search for November, 1863 AD in all documents.

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, with the restriction that not a yard be sold to retailers and speculators. This provision was a great aid to the families, as it added to private domestic production. The military board, established by the legislature on the 11th of January, 1862, with Governor Lubbock, Comptroller C. R. Johns and Treasurer C. H. Randolph as its officers, all of them long and closely identified with the people of Texas and fast friends of their well-being, had procured from Mexico and Europe before November, 1863, over 40,000 pairs of cotton and woolen cards, to be supplied to Texas families for home use, at greatly reduced cost, by which the people were saved thousands of dollars. The general commanding the district of Texas early in 1862 commenced, through agents, the purchase of cotton and the transportation of it to Mexico to purchase arms, cloth and the munitions of war, and this was kept up during the war. On November 21, 1862, General Hebert issued an order prohibiting the exportation o
numbers against them, entailing upon them no loss of honor or manhood. Though they bowed with submission to the sad fate of defeat, their heads were still erect with the self-esteem inspired by the consciousness of duty well done, and with a conviction of the justice and of the right for which they fought still unshaken. There is no information accessible that affords an accurate statement of the number of soldiers that were furnished by Texas. Governor Lubbock, in his last message, November, 1863, stated the number as then estimated to be 90,000. There may have been more before the close of the war. Nor can the number of deaths by sickness and in battle be given. It may not be out of place here to show how greatly our soldiers suffered by changes of localities in their service, a valuable lesson learned in climatology. Those soldiers who served in Texas and in the Indian Territory lost few of their numbers from deaths or from discharges on account of sickness. Those who wer
on to his public service in the ante-Confederate period, which has been mentioned, he acted as clerk to Governor Lubbock when the latter was comptroller of the Texas republic, and was speaker of the third house of representatives of the State. During 1861 he was in command of State troops on the coast as brigadier-general in the provisional army of Texas, and in March, 1862, when he was commissioned brigadier-general in the Confederate service, he was put in command at Brownsville. In November, 1863, he had but 69 men at this post, but, in the face of 12,000 men, landed by General Banks, he successfully brought off Confederate stores and munitions valued at $1,000,000. During the following winter he commanded a force of 10,000 men on the coast, from Brazos to Matagorda bay: and early in 1864 he took several regiments of cavalry to Louisiana, with three of which he reported to Gen. Richard Taylor in time to participate in the battle of Mansfield. At Pleasant Hill on the afternoon of