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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 23 23 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 7 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for November 16th, 1863 AD or search for November 16th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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lution, adopted January 28, 1862: That the women of the State of Mississippi, for their exertions in behalf of the cause of Southern Independence, are entitled to the hearty thanks of every lover of his country; and this legislature, acting from a sense of justice and of gratitude, extend to them individually and collectively the sincere thanks of the people of this State for their noble efforts in aiding the cause of our common country. In his inaugural address to the legislature, November 16, 1863, on this subject, Governor Clark said: One of the most gratifying indications of the times is the resolute spirit of industry manifested by our women. The spinning-wheel is preferred to the harp, and the loom makes music of loftier patriotism and inspiration than the keys of the piano. In a memorial to the Confederate Congress, approved August 2, 1861, in reference to buying and holding all cotton and tobacco as a basis of credit, this language occurs: We, the representatives of a