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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for December, 1863 AD or search for December, 1863 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
Navy Department had found an opportunity to reward this gallant officer for his services at New Orleans, and although no important military or naval movements were going on within the limits of this command, it was the only way in which the Secretary of tile Navy could show his high appreciation of Bailey's gallantry and devotion to his country's service. The limits of this command extended along the Florida Peninsula from Cape Canaveral on the east, to Pensacola on the west. Up to December, 1863, the little squadron under Bailey had exercised the greatest watchfulness along the coast, had captured many prizes, and had apparently broken up the illicit traffic by which the Confederates had been supplied with munitions of war. Lying adjacent to Cuba, and at no great distance from the English possessions of Nassau and Bermuda, the coast of Florida presented many available points for the introduction of all kinds of material by means of small vessels that could enter the shallow harb
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 38: review of the work done by the Navy in the year 1863. (search)
exhibited great energy, and, for the first time in its history, the United States had a Navy commensurate with its importance as a maritime power. The following table exhibits the progress made in increasing the Navy since December, 1862, and shows what the country was capable of achieving under a pressure that would have almost crushed any other nation: Comparative exhibit of the Navy, Dec., 1862, and 1863.   No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Navy at date of present Report--Dec., 1863. 588 4,443 467,967 Navy at date of last Report--Dec., 1862. 427 3,268 340,036 Total increase 161 1,175 127,931 Vessels of the Navy lost since Dec., 1862. In What Manner Lost. No. of Vessels. No. of Guns. Tons. Captured 12 48 5,947 Destroyed to prevent falling into hands of Confederates 3 29 2,983 Sunk in battle or by torpedoes 4 28 2,201 Shipwreck, fire and collision 13 61 4,854 Total 32 166 15,985 Vessels placed under construction since Dec., 1862. Des
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 51 (search)
&c., fitted for naval purposes 921 78,762 112 Sailing vessels of all classes 850 69,549 671 Total 4,610 510,396 Comparative statement of the Navy, December, 1863 and 1864. No. of vessels. Description. No. of guns. No. of tons. 671 Total navy, December, 1864 4,610 510,396 588 Total navy, December, 1863 4,443 December, 1863 4,443 467,967 83 Actual increase for the year 167 42,429 26 Total losses by shipwreck, in battle, capture, &c., during the year 146 13,084 109 Actual addition to the navy from December, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw slooDecember, 1863, to December, 1864 313 55,513 Vessels constructed for the Navy since March 4, 1861. No. Description. Guns. Tonnage 7 Screw sloops, Ammonoosuc class, 17 to 19 guns, 3,213 to 3,713 tons each 121 23,637 1 Screw sloop Idaho, 8 guns, 2,638 tons 8 2,638 8 Screw sloops, spar deck, Java class, 25 guns and 3,177 tons each 200 25,416 2 Screw sloops, spar deck, Hassalo class, 25 guns and 3,365 tons each 50 6,730 10 Screw sloops, clippers, single deck, Co
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 52: operations about Charleston, 1865.--fall of Charleston, Savannah, etc. (search)
e addition of others, were anchored at one end in two lines, and rode to the tide. It is probable that the casks seen on the 7th April were the turpentine barrels of this obstruction; and, moreover, a plan of the entrance, signed by Major Echols, engineer, shows the double line of rope obstructions. In the summer of 1863 the boom of railroadiron was placed, consisting of several timbers banded into a mass and floating the railroad bars. And this account is so far confirmed that in December, 1863, a quantity of boom answering to this description was washed away by the winter gales and came down the channel. Some of it was hauled up on the beach of Morris Island. I saw this work in progress one day, and was told that as many as thirty-three of the bars had been secured. I have been at a loss to understand the exact manner in which these bars were connected to the timbers. The accounts given do not accord, and some separation had generally been effected before any of them wer