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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 371 371 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 36 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 28 28 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 16 16 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 8 8 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for December, 1863 AD or search for December, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Graduates of the United States Military Academy at West Point, N. Y., [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, March 30, April 6, 27, and May 12, 1902.] (search)
ent, 1864. Henry C. Wayne. 954. Born Georgia. Appointed Georgia. 14. Brigadier-General, December 18, 1861. Declined appointment, and became Adjutant-General of State of Georgia. Milton A. Haynes. 958. Born Tennessee. Appointed Tennessee. 18. Lieutenant-Colonel. Commanding First Tennessee Light Artillery. William J. Hardee. 966. Born Georgia. Appointed Georgia. 26. Lieutenant-General, October 11, 1862. Commanding Corps, Army of Tennessee, and for a time (December, 1863) commanded Army of Tennessee. Henry H. Sibley. 971. Born Louisiana. Appointed Louisiana. 31. Brigadier-General, June 17, 1861. Commanding district in Texas, headquarters, San Antonio. Edward Johnson. 972. Born Kentucky. Appointed Kentucky. 32. Major-General, April 22, 1863. Commanding division in Ewell's Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. Alexander W. Reynolds. 975. Born Virginia. Appointed Virginia. 35. Brigadier-General, September 14, 1862. Commanding
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Treatment and exchange of prisoners. (search)
by letter no reply was received. He renewed these efforts on October 20th, 1863, saying: I now propose that all officers and men on both sides be released in conformity with the provisions of the cartel, the excess on one side or the other, to be on parole. Will you accept this? I have no expectation of an answer, but perhaps you may give one. If it does come, I hope it will be soon. Id., p. 401. But nothing was accomplished by both of these efforts. Some time in November or December, 1863, General B. F. Butler was appointed the Federal Commissioner of Exchange. It will be remembered that this man had been outlawed by the Confederate authorities prior to this time, and it was openly charged, and generally believed, that this appointment was made solely to make communication between the belligerents the more difficult by embarrassing the Confederates, and consequently to throw this additional obstacle in the way of further exchange of prisoners. Immediately on taking c