Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 12th, 1863 AD or search for December 12th, 1863 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 15.-movements on the Rapidan. New-York Tribune account. headquarters Third division, Sixth corps, army of the Potomac, December 12, 1863. at half-past 6, on the morning of November twenty-sixth, (Thanksgiving,) the Second corps, Major-General G. K. Warren, left its camp on Mountain Run and marched to Germania Ford, with a battery of four four and a half-inch guns and one battery of six twenty-pounder Parrott guns from the reserve artillery, with three hundred cavalry, under the command of Captain Schwartz, of the Fourth New-York cavalry, and a pontoon train, under the command of Captain Mendell of the Engineers corps. The head of this column reached the steep embankments at Germania Ford, at half-past 8 A. M. Here a thick growth of almost impenetrable woods was met, and considerable time was occupied in felling trees, cutting out roads, and placing the artillery in position. All this was done with the greatest rapidity, and in the face of the enemy's pickets on th
Doc. 24.-Gen. Grant and rebel deserters. The oath he prescribed for their acceptance. headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Chattanooga, Tenn., Dec. 12, 1863. General orders, No. 10. To obtain uniformity in the disposition of deserters from the confederate armies coming with-in this military division, the following order is published: I. All deserters from the enemy coming within our lines will be conducted to the commander of division or detached brigade who shall be nearest the place of surrender. II. If such commander is satisfied that the deserters desire to quit the confederate service, he may permit them to go to their homes, if within our lines, on taking the following oath: The oath. I do solemnly swear in the presence of Almighty God, that I will henceforth faithfully support, protect, and defend the Constitution of the United States and the Union of States there-under, and that I will, in like manner, abide by an
Doc. 118.-the retreat of Longstreet. Bean Station, Tenn., Rutledge road, December 12, 1863. Ascertaining that the enemy had raised the siege, See the Siege of Knoxville, Doc. 19, ante. and were on the retreat early on Saturday morning, December fifth, General Shackleford, commanding the cavalry corps, was ordered in pursuit. He commenced skirmishing with the enemy's rear-guard eight miles from Knoxville, on the Rutledge and Morristown road. He drove them steadily to Bean Station, forty-two miles from Knoxville, where he found the enemy's cavalry in line of battle. On Thursday mornings, Colonel Bond's brigade, of Woodford's division, was in the advance. He charged, and drove the enemy from the place. The treating army had been foraging right and left along their line of retreat. He captured about one hundred and fifty prisoners during the pursuit as far as to Bean Station. Many of the rebels, both infantry and cavalry, purposely fell out and gave themselves up. T