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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 9 document sections:

ecessity, may act as officers or inspectors. Now, whereas, in many of the counties there are no county courts, sheriffs, or justices of the peace, and in others the persons now and heretofore filling these offices are disloyal, and therefore disqualified, in all such counties some respectable citizen of the county will be appointed to hold said elections, appoint the judges, clerks, and other officers, either by himself or his deputies, and administer the oath to such officers, and receive the votes and make due returns to the office of Secretary of State. All other steps will be taken looking to the election of the other officers, Federal and State, as soon as practicable. In testimony whereof, I, Andrew Johnson, Military Governor of the State of Tennessee, do hereunto set my hand, and cause the Great L. S.Seal of the State to be affixed, at this Department, on the twenty-sixth day of January, A. D. 1864. Andrew Johnson. By the Governor, Edward H. East, Secretary of State.
their purpose to add by legislation largely to your strength, you may welcome the invader with a confidence justified by the memory of past victories. On the other hand, debt, taxation, repetition of heavy drafts, dissensions occasioned by the strife for power, by the pursuit of the spoils of office, by the thirst for the plunder of the public treasury, and, above all, the consciousness of a bad cause, must tell with fearful force upon the overstrained energies of the enemy. His campaign of 1864 must, from the exhaustion of his resources of men and money, be far less formidable than those of the last two years, when unimpaired means were used with boundless prodigality, and with results which are suggested by the mention of the names of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, and the Chickahominy, Manassas, Fredericksburgh, and Chancellorsville. Soldiers: Assured success awaits us in our holy struggle for liberty and independence, and for the preservation of all that renders life desira
ghteen mules and sets of harness; 2500 pounds of bacon; two fine horses, saddles, and bridles; about 1000 head of cattle, and one prisoner, G. R. Paul, government agent. All the articles captured I gave to the refugees, as they were of no use to us. The estimate value of the above property to the rebels cannot be less than $3,000,000. That is the value put upon it by the most intelligent refugees. List of articles and property destroyed on Goose Creek by the boats' crew from the United States steamer Tahoma, February twenty-sixth and twenty-seventh, 1864: Two thousand bushels of salt in barrels and bins; three corn-cribs, containing about 1000 bushels; large quantity of hay and fodder; blacksmith's shop and tools; carpenter's shop and tools; about 100 store and other houses, stables, etc.; 165 kettles and pans, average capacity, 100 gallons; 53 large boilers, of about 800 gallons capacity each; 98 well-constructed brick furnaces; nine wagons and carts, 20 sets mule harness.
Doc. 92.-escape of the Florida. Report of Commander Preble. United States sloop-of-war St. Louis, Funchal roads, Madeira, March 1, 1 1/2 A. M., 1864. sir: The Florida has succeeded in getting to sea. I shall follow at once, though hopeless of catching her out of port. Nelson said, the want of frigates in his squadron would be found impressed on his heart. I am sure the want of steam will be found engraven on mine. Had the St. Louis been a steamer, I would have anchored alongside of her, and, unrestricted by the twenty-four hour rule, my old foe could not have escaped me. The Governor, true to his declared intention, would only allow her to take on board twenty tons of coal, sufficient to take her to the nearest port. Her commander plead for sixty tons, next forty, asserting that he needed that much to ballast his vessel. The Governor told him, at the suggestion of Mr. Bayman, that he came in without it, and he thought he could go without it; but if ballast was needed
rom the Collector of the Customs, according to law, showing no violation of the conditions of the license. Any violation of said conditions will involve the forfeiture and condemnation of the vessel and cargo, and the exclusion of all parties concerned from any further privilege of entering the United States during the war for any purpose whatever. In all respects, except as herein specified, the existing blockade remains in full force and effect as hitherto established and maintained, nor is it relaxed by this proclamation, except in regard to the port to which relaxation is or has been expressly applied. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done at the City of Washington, this eighteenth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, and of the independence of the United States the eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln. By the President: Wm. H. Seward, Secretary of State.
nty years after their date, bearing interest at the rate of four per cent per annum, payable on the first day of January and July of each year. Sec. 2. The Secretary of the Treasury is hereby authorized to issue the bonds required for the funding provided for in the preceding section; and, until the bonds can be prepared, he may issue certificates to answer the purpose. Such bonds and certificates shall be receivable, without interest, in payment of all government dues payable in the year 1864, except export and import duties. Sec. 3. That all treasury notes of the denomination of one hundred dollars, not bearing interest, which shall not be presented for funding under the provisions of the first section of this act, shall, from and after the first .day of April, 1864, east of the Mississippi River, and the first day of July, 1864, west of the Mississippi River, cease to be receivable in payment of public dues; and said notes, if not presented at that time, shall, in addition to
ca, do issue this, my proclamation, calling upon the people of the said States, in conformity with the desire expressed by their representatives, to set apart Friday, the eighth day of April, as a day of humiliation, fasting, and prayer; and I do hereby invite them on that day to repair to their several places of public worship, and beseech Almighty God to preside over our public counsels, and so inspire our armies and leaders with wisdom, courage, and perseverance, and so to manifest himself in the greatness of his goodness and in the majesty of his power, that we may secure the blessings of an honorable peace and of free government, and that we, as a people, may ascribe all to the honor and glory of his name. Given under my hand and the seal of the confederate [L. S.] States of America, at the city of Richmond, on this twelfth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State.
on, who, by the law thereof, may be qualified for administering oaths. All officers who receive such oaths are hereby authorized to give certificates thereon to the persons respectively by whom they are made. And such officers are hereby required to transmit the original records of such oaths at as early a day as may be convenient to the Department of State, where they will be deposited and remain in the archives of the Government. The Secretary of State will keep a register thereof, and will, on application, in proper cases, issue certificates of such records, in the customary form of such certificates. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. Done in the City of Washington, the twenty-sixth day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, and of the Independence of the United States the eighty-eighth. Abraham Lincoln. By the President: William H. Seward, Secretary of State.
Doc. 142.-message of Jefferson Davis. Delivered may 2, 1864. To the Senate and House of Representatives of the Confederate States of America: You are assembled under circumstances of deep interest to your country; and it is fortunate that, coming as you do, newly elected by the people, and familiar with the condition of the various localities, you will be better able to devise measures adapted to meet the wants of the public service without imposing unnecessary burdens on the citizen. The brief period which has elapsed since the last adjournment of Congress has not afforded sufficient opportunity to test the efficacy of the most important laws then enacted, nor have the events occurring in the interval been such as materially to change the state of the country. The unjust war commenced against us, in violation of the rights of the States, and in usurpation of power not delegated to the government of the United States, is still characterized by the barbarism with which