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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 14 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
ate Veterans, 156 Washington Avenue, New Orleans, La. Camp 1. New Orleans, La.; W. R. Lyman, com'der; med. offi., F. Tormento, surg.; W. P. Brewer, asst. surg., 1864; members, 214; deaths, 24; State Camp Home, Nicholls. Camp 2. New Orleans, La.; J. B. Vincent, com.; Y. R. LeMonnier, surg.; members, 307; deaths, 170; State Cambers, 56; deaths, I. Camp 14. Opelousa, La.; Capt. D. L. Prescott, com. Camp 15. New Orleans, La.; Col. B. F. Eshleman, com.; med. Offi., Dr. W. P. Brewer, 1864, asst. surg.; members, 251; indigent members, 3; deaths, 6; State Camp Home. Camp 16. New Orleans, La.; Gen. Jos. Demourelle, com. Camp 17. Baton Rouge, La.;60; disabled, 2. Camp 121. Mt. Pleasant, Texas; Capt. C. L. Dillahuntz, com. Camp 122. Belton, Texas; Maj. J. G. Whitsitt, corn.; med. offi., Dr. G. H. Tend, 1864, surgeon; members, 625; disabled, 18; deaths, 6. Camp 123. Buffalo Gap, Texas; Capt. Ben. F. Jones, corn. Camp 124. Bryan, Texas; Capt. H. B. Stoddard, com.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Monument to the Confederate dead at the University of Virginia. (search)
a relief to his commanding officer, when the foeman's merciful bullet let the agonized spirit out of the miserable body, to see his arms fly up wildly, and to catch, as it were, his death cry— Thank God! this hell is past. During the winter of 1864-1864, two or three of General Alexander's field officers, First Corps Artillery, A. N. V., were sent to Chaffin's Bluff, for the purpose of toning up the garrison there, which had been demoralized by the disaster at Fort Harrison, the capture of t1864, two or three of General Alexander's field officers, First Corps Artillery, A. N. V., were sent to Chaffin's Bluff, for the purpose of toning up the garrison there, which had been demoralized by the disaster at Fort Harrison, the capture of their commanding officer and other untoward incidents. The morale of the men had decidedly improved before the final crash came, but that was enough to try the mettle even of the best troops in the highest condition. The men of the fleet and of the James river defenses were ordered to leave the river about midnight of the 2d of April, exploding magazines and ironclads, and joining the Army of Northern Virginia on its retreat. The troops at Chaffin's, having been long in garrison, and rightly d
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The muster roll [from the Staunton, Va., Vindicator, March 3, 1893.] (search)
rsville, 1863. John H. Zimmerman, died prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1864. Matthias Fix, living at Middlebrook. James Gabbert, killed atng at Zack, Va. Clemmer, John C., died prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1864. Clemmer, George L., died since the war. Carson, William, livi, living at Rockbridge Baths. Hupp, B. F., killed at Cedar Creek, 1864. Kerr, R. Bruce, died in Georgia since the war. Lotts, Cyrus, killed at Spotsylvania Courthouse, 1864. McCutchan, J. R., living at Middlebrook. McGuffin, Charles W., died since the war. McManamy,ett's Creek. Lucas, John H., August 3, died a prisoner at Elmira, 1864. Montgomery, John, August 3, died of disease, September, 1861. Palmer, Jacob, August 3, died a prisoner at Fort Delaware, 1864. Smith, George A., August 3, living at Martinsburg, W. Va. Wright, Jame, July 3, 1863; Mine Run, November 7, 1863; Wilderness, May 5 and 6, 1864; Spotsylvania C. H., May 12 and 18, 1864; Haw's Shop, May 30, 1864;
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Last days of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ne-Run. During that year it allowed no invading army to approach at any time within five days march of its capital. In 1864 it hurled back one column at Bermuda Hundreds, another at New Market, still another at Lynchburg; won victory at Kernstown to use the bulk of the extra duty men in battle, as any experienced soldier knows. General Humphreys' Virginia Campaign, 1864-1865, page 409, speaking of such a claim, says: The column present for duty equipped, is intended to give the number ofin nearly all conditions and circumstances that fight with the soldier and give power and soul to armies. The winter of 1864-5 was one of marked severity, making duty of any kind very arduous. The clothing of the Confederate troops, which at bestr successfully prosecute further invasion. Another still more critical period arose in the latter part of the summer of 1864. In the spring of that year the Confederates had crushed an invading force in Florida, and practically ended the seige of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), William Lowndes Yancey, [from the Moutgomery, Ala., daily Advertiser, April 15, 1893.] (search)
servers and shufflers, and representing the Republicans as being determined to wipe out slavery, even if they had to resort to servile insurrection. I remember that John Milton, a delegate from Florida (he was chosen Governor in 1862, but died in 1864), said, His plan was for Southern men to take the Constitution in one hand and a musket in the other, and to march to Fanueil Hall in Boston, demand their constitutional rights, and if they were not granted, to go to work at once with their muskeimpression is he somewhat antagonized Jefferson Davis' administration—he thought militaryism was too much over-slaughing the civil authority in the South—at least he expressed himself in that way in a letter written to this writer in the spring of 1864, from Richmond. In the then situation of the South, the military authority needed to be strengthened. A Danton was needed to procure a decree for a levy en masse in the South—for placing negroes in the army, and for converting the South into a c<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
A desperate dash. [from the Richmond (Va.) dispatch, January 2, 1894.] Capture and Reoccupation of the Howlett House in 1864. The gallant achievement of Colonel Morrison R. H., in the dispatch of Jan. 14, 1894, whilst admitting that the account is full and accurate in the main, claims that Captain J. D. Waid of the Hanover Grays commanded the skirmish line on that occasion, and not Colonel Morrison who was absent and did not take command until the following morning.—Ed. and Captain Hudgin and their commands without any orders. On the 16th day of June, 1864, when Grant's flank movement across the James river threatened Petersburg, and it was found necessary to send forces to defend that city, which was in imminent peril from an attack on the east, Confederate troops were withdrawn from General Butler's front, on the Bermuda Hundreds line, and hurried across the Appomattox to foil the Federal forces. The exigencies of the occasion were so urgent and unexpected, that no
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
le. It lay in camp most of the winter, opposite Vicksburg. In the spring it took part in the operations around that city, being in two charges. After the surrender of Vicksburg the battery was sent to Jackson, where it stayed until that city was evacuated. It took part in the fight at Missionary Ridge in the fall, and followed General Bragg until he took refuge in Dalton, Ga., and later took up winter quarters in Larkinville, Ga. It took part in the campaign in Georgia the following year, 1864, and lost all of its guns. A charge was made and two of them were recaptured, but the rebels retreated, taking the other four with them. After the evacuation of Atlanta the battery was reorganized and moved back to Nashville, and then to Chattanooga, where it remained until June, 1865, when it was ordered home and mustered out of service. However willing veterans may be to make allowances for statements of the boys in their moments of jollification, and however flattering it may be for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The bloody angle. (search)
can now be seen in the war office at Washington city. I have spoken of this charge of Hancock's corps, because it has been ignorantly charged that our troops were taken by surprise. There may have been some want of care on the part of the troops and their officers in not keeping their powder dry, and had it been a rainy night, they would have taken greater precautions, and the disaster would never have occurred. As an illustration of the dangers and the casualties of the campaign of 1864, it is only necessary to take Johnson's division as a sample. That division had been recruited and reorganized during the preceding winter, and went into the campaign with a major-general, four brigadier-generals, and a full complement of field and company officers. Its rank and file was composed of about 6,000 men. On the 5th and 6th of May, two of its brigade commanders were killed, and about one-half of its field officers, and about one-third of the men were killed or wounded. After the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
Fort Fisher. [from the Wilmington, N. C., weekly messenger, June 22, 1893] The battles fought there in 1864 and 1865. An interesting address by Colonel William Lamb, of Norfolk, Virginia, written at the request of Cape Fear Camp, United Confederate Veterans, of Wilmington—The truth of history Graphically told. Colononed by a detachment from the Confederate States Navy. An advanced redoubt with a twenty-four pounder was added after the repulse of Butler and Porter, Christmas, 1864. A wharf for large steamers was in close proximity to this work. Battery Buchanan was a citadel to which an overpowered garrison might retreat and with proper trthe bar in daylight of the powder-laden Cornubia, in 1862, and the A. D. Vance, with a party of ladies and Dr. Hoge, of Richmond, with Bibles for the soldiers, in 1864 (the latter steamer rescued by a timely shot from a ten-inch Columbiad in the fort), were incidents never to be forgotten. The recapture of the Kate of London and
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
urne. [from the New Orleans Picayeune, July 2, 1893.] Comanche, Texas, June 12, 1893. Editor of The Picayune.: I send you a few incidents of the life of General Pat. Cleburne, which I have never seen in print, and which may be of interest to your many readers and the members of his old division. General Cleburne was a gallant soldier, a hard fighter, always kind and courteous to his men, who almost worshipped him, and who believed old Pat could whip all creation. In the fall of 1864, Cleburne's division was thrown with a portion of the army across the Coosa river, above Rome, Ga., and started across the mountains of North Georgia to the railroad leading to Atlanta. We were cut off from our supply trains, and had to live off the country through which we passed. Apples, chestnuts, and persimmons were plenty, so we did pretty well. Strict orders had been issued that we must not depredate upon private property. One morning on leaving camp, General Granbury's brigade led
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