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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 26 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), United Confederate Veterans. (search)
. S. Satchwell, M. D., Wilmington, N. C. Edward Warren-Bey, lately deceased at Paris, formerly medical director of Army of North Carolina during the war 1861-65. Department of South Carolina—Medical Director, Peyre Porcher, M. D., Charleston, S. C., formerly surgeon P. A. C. S. Medical Inspector, A. N. Tally, M. D., formerly president of Examining Board C. S. A. at Richmond, Va.; Middleton Michel, Charleston, formerly surgeon and editor of Confederate States Medical Journal, Richmond, Va., 1864-65. Department of Georgia—James B. Read, M. D., Savannah, Ga., formerly in charge of Officers' Hospital, Richmond, Va., C. S. A., 1861-65. Medical Inspectors, A. B. M. Miller, M. D., lately deceased, Atlanta, Ga., formerly chief surgeon Department of Georgia, C. S. A.; J. McF. Gaston, M. D., Atlanta, Ga., formerly surgeon P. A. C. S.; G. E. Flewellen, M. D., Thomaston, Ga., formerly medical director Army of Tennessee, 1861-1861. Department of Alabama—Medical Director, R. F. Michel, M.<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Third Battery of Maryland Artillery, C. S. A. Its history in brief, and its commanders. (search)
ueen of the West, after the capture of that vessel. Three guns, with the main body of the battery, were in the siege of Vicksburg, and at the capitulation, July 4, 1863, were surrendered. The battery was reorganized at Decatur, Ga., in October, 1863, and ordered to Sweet Water, Tenn., afterwards to Lookout Mountain, near Chattanooga. Was in the battle of Missionary Ridge and in the retreat to Dalton, Ga., November, 1863. Served under Generals Johnston and Hood in the Georgia campaign of 1864. Was with General Hood in his march to Nashville, Tenn., and his disastrous retreat to Columbus, Miss. February, 1865, ordered to Mobile, Ala., and afterwards to Meridian, Miss., where, under General R. Taylor, May 4, 1865, the battery was surrendered and the men paroled. The commanders during the war were: Captain Henry B. Latrobe, left service March 1, 1863; Captain Fred. O. Claiborne, killed at Vicksburg, June 24, 1863; Captain John B. Rowan, killed at Nashville, December 16, 1864; Cap
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Capture and Reoccupation of the Howlett House in 1864. (search)
Capture and Reoccupation of the Howlett House in 1864. Zzzwho commanded the 15th Virginia Infantry in the desperate dash. A communication from Colonel Morrison, embracing extracts from letters from other participants. In the last volume of the Papers (Xxi), pp. 177-188, there was republished from the Richmond Dispatch, of January 2, 1894, an article under the chief caption, A Desperate Dash. The Editor has pleasure in now presenting the well-tempered reply as to who was actually commander in this so valorous charge. To the Editor of the Dispatch.: A controversy having arisen as to who was in command of the Fifteenth Virginia Infantry on the afternoon of the 16th of June, 1864, when the regiment, deployed as skirmishers, so gallantly drove the enemy out of and held the works on the Howlett-house line, and a statement of mine, in a previous newspaper article, giving my recollection of the affair, having been declared erroneous, I beg leave to submit the annexe
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
ed hard to succeed as a planter, but at his death left only a meagre inheritance to his family. Mrs. General Ewell, who died three days after her husband, owned a very considerable property in St. Louis, and maintained a very comfortable establishment. General Bragg left no property, and his widow went to live with her sister in New Orleans. General Hood was far from being wealthy, and General S. Cooper was absolutely poor. Major-General Whiting, of Fort Fisher fame, who died in prison in 1864, left nothing, and General L. M. Walker, killed by Marmaduke in a duel, left but little to his wife. General Buckner had a varied experience. His wife owned large tracts of unimproved real estate in Chicago, which was confiscated, but afterward recovered. It was then mortgaged, built up, and, in a panic, sacrificed for the mortgaged money, leaving him poor. General Zack Deas, of Alabama, whose name may not have been equal to that of others, was a shrewd financier. He went into Wall str
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.18 (search)
William Mahone, and it is of service in this command that this paper will treat. Zzzbattalion of selected men. Whilst in winter quarters at Madison Run Station, on the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, near Gordonsville, Va., in the winter of 1864, General Mahone conceived the idea of forming a battalion of selected men from the brigade, who should be required to do all advanced duty during the campaign, and, after consultation with a few of the line officers in whom he had confidence, he i their companies and others substituted, so also, when the casualties of battle decimated the ranks, other details were made from the regiment in which the loss occurred, thereby keeping up the full maximum of strength. Thus, when the campaign of 1864 opened, this body of 180 officers and men, selected for special duty and because of eminent qualifications for such service, appeared thoroughly trained and fully equipped, and their subsequent record proved that they were absolutely invincible in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
know it is considered by military men as an unique feat. I wish I were able to describe it. I recall the enthusiasm it created, and also remember the fate of the gallant Latane, the only casualty. It is not of this that I would write. I was not with the boys then. It is of Hampton's great cattle raid, in September, 1864, that I propose to write in my own plain way, just as I remember it, and just as I read of it, now that it is all over. Zzzthe Mise en scene. In the early part of 1864 General Lee's army was facing General Grant's at Petersburg, and his infantry lines extended from the Appomattox on the east to about Dinwiddie Courthouse on the southwest. South of this the cavalry held the lines. I say held them, not as the infantry did, but patrolled them all the way down to Stony creek, and sometimes beyond. We were too few to man the lines, so we rode them one night here, and tomorrow somewhere else on the line, repelling from time to time by the hardest kind of figh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.24 (search)
Directors Office of the Army of Tennessee, in his hands for preservation. Dr. Logan as Post Surgeon of Atlanta in 1863-1864; of Augusta, Georgia, in 1864-1865, placed these manuscript volumes in my possession in order to aid in my labors in behal1864-1865, placed these manuscript volumes in my possession in order to aid in my labors in behalf of the medical corps of the Confederate army. In consolidating the two manscript volumes, containing the names, rank and services of the medical officers, I have been greatly aided by my daughters Miss C. S. Jones and Miss Mary C. Jones, who weralry. Moseley, W. H., Surgeon. June 30, 1864, Perrin's Regiment Cavalry. morrow, W. R., Assistant Surgeon. Oct 22, 1864, Medical Purveyor Stuart's Corps. Murphy, J. R., Assistant Surgeon. June 30, 1864, 31st Mississippi Regiment. Nash, mied officer from the Army of Tennessee to Richmond, where he continued his duties as Medical-Inspector during the summer of 1864, and by request of the Surgeon in charge, Dr. Hancock, and the attending Surgeons, Drs. Cabell, Hoyt, Thom and Wellford, h
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
was right, and in the presidential election of 1864, when the issue between Lincoln and McClellan wcacy, July 9th, 1864. His three victories in 1864 were the last in which the Army of Northern Virof this or of any age. Zzzvalley Campaign of 1864. Thus have I given you some of the salient pst that I should discuss his Valley Campaign of 1864. You may have been under the impression that Iring this brief hour. The Valley Campaign of 1864 had its beginning yonder at Cold Harbor, in sigcavalry, which he alone retained. Thus ended 1864, Early having some 3,000 men at Staunton, and SFor two years he was not again in battle; until 1864, when he took command of a defeated army at Dals, in 1861; Shiloh, in 1862; and Petersburg, in 1864. He was victorious in the first, fortune faileet this be said, that his desperate campaign of 1864 prolonged the life of the Confederacy a year — y the spot where Tinsley sounded the advance in 1864, and all was over. As we turned away from th[2 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
race, 35. Gregg, Percy, on the South, 93. Hampton, Gen., Wade. His duel with a Federal soldier at Gettysburg, 122; his capture of Grant's entire beef supply in 1864, 147; his force, 153; mentioned, 347. Hazlewood, Capt. Martin W., 48. Herald, Baltimore, Md , cited, 157. Heroism, The Bond of, 67. Hoge, D. D., Rev. M352. Hollywood Memorial Association. Their sacred labors, 388. Hooker, Hon. Charles E., 46. Howitzers, Richmond, 54. Howlett House, Recapture of the, in 1864, 20. Hunter, Captain in the 41st Virginia Infantry, killed, 105. Ironclads in the C. S. Navy, 75; in the English and French Navies, 77. Jackson, Stonewal Iron Works, 90. United Confederate Veterans; organization of the Medical Corps of; report of Surgeon-General Jos. Jones, M. D., Ll.D., 14. Valley Campaign of 1864, The, 292. Veteran Camps at the Unveiling of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 347 Virginia Cavalry, 14th, Co. H; Survivors of, 74. Virginia Infantry,