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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Work of the Ordnance Bureau of the war Department of the Confederate States, 1861-5. (search)
t Augusta; in each of these but a single man, I believe, was injured. The incorporating house of a small private powder mill near Raleigh, N. C., blew up in 1862, with the loss of three or four lives. At the time of the abandonment of Atlanta in 1864, a number of railroad cars containing a large part of the reserve ammunition of Genl. Hood's army, by some mistake were left on tracks of which connection with the main line had been broken, and these valuable ordnance supplies were, under orders,es deserve to be remembered. Among the most prominent, and among those of whom I saw most and most corresponded with, were Lieut. Cols. J. H. Burton, Although doubtless having previously had his rank, Mr. Burton did not, I believe, in 1863 and 1864 hold any military commission in the service of the Confederate States. Superintendent of Armories; T. L. Bayne, in charge of the Bureau of Foreign Supplies, and I. M. St. John at the head of the Nitre and Mining Bureau; Lieut. Col. G. W. Rains, of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
Bragg, William, exempted from service, 1862. Bryant, Richard A., died in service, 1862. Carroll, John D., lost his life capturing a Federal gunboat, winter, 1864. Clift, M. B., died since the war. Clopton, Walter, wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Cosby, Charles, exempted from service, 1861. Cosby, George, corpom Nelson, killed at Manassas, Va., 1861, July 21st. Pendleton, E. H., on detail service during the war; dead. Pettit, Lucius H., killed near Petersburg, Va., 1864. Ryals, James D., served as courier to General Pickett. Sclater, Richard O., wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Spencer, John M., (volunteer), wounded atg. I regret that I could not be more explicit and accurate in recording the names and deeds of the recruits, most of whom came to the company during the winter of 1864 and were not long with the command before its surrender and came from different sections of the State, unlike the old organization, all of whom I knew personally a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Major Andrew Reid Venable, Jr. [from Richmond, Va., Times-Dispatch.] (search)
uarter Staff of the Cavalry, with the rank of Major, and announced in General Orders as Assistant Adjutant and Inspector-General of the Corps. From that time until his capture at the battle of Hatcher's Run (or Burgess's Mill), in the autumn of 1864 (Oct. 27th), the story of Venable's career is the story of that splendid body of horse, whose deeds gave Stuart his imperishable renown. It was an open secret at Cavalry Headquarters, that of all the splendid and capable staff officers there—Heeneral Wade Hampton. Time would fail to deal in detail with the active part he bore in the constant cavalry engagements of those stirring August and September days. But one signal service may, at least, be touched upon. On September 14th (1864), Hampton, having ascertained through his scouts the exact location of the great corral for the supply cattle of the Army of the Potomac, determined to make a bold raid in Grant's rear, and, if possible, to lift (in Hieland phrase) the fat beeves
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Who was last soldier to leave burning city. (search)
me for a narrative of the circumstances of my retreat. Colonel Sulivane has written elsewhere: Concerning that retreat from Richmond there has been a curious coincidence of record between Lieutenant-Colonel H. Kyd Douglas, of Hagerstown, Md., and myself. When not quite twenty-three we both left our homes in Maryland and enlisted as private soldiers in the Confederate Army in the spring of 1861. That fall we were both promoted to the staff as first lieutenants and aides-de-camp. In 1864 we were both in the Adjutant-General's Department with the rank of captain on the brigade staff. When our respective generals became major-generals in the early spring of 1865, we became entitled to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, but application was not made for our commissions as such, because we were both recommended to be made brigadier-generals. The order for such commissions was issued by President Davis, but did not reach us in the general turmoil and confusion of the last days of Ri
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
nel Mosby writes as follows: Department of Justice, Washington, July 16, 1909. Mr. William L. White: Dear Sir:—Your letter of inquiry in reference to Joe Bryan just received. I do not remember the date when he joined me, but do know that in 1864 he was wounded in a fight near Upperville; that in 1864 he was detailed to watch in the Bull Run Mountain, when I was lying wounded in Fauquier, and that in February, 1865, he was in what I have always said was the most brilliant affair of my commin 1864 he was wounded in a fight near Upperville; that in 1864 he was detailed to watch in the Bull Run Mountain, when I was lying wounded in Fauquier, and that in February, 1865, he was in what I have always said was the most brilliant affair of my command, when Major Richards with thirty-seven men attacked and routed a Major Gibson with 150 men (Fourteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry), killing, wounding and capturing nearly the whole force. I was then absent wounded. Very truly, John S. Mosby