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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Personal Poems (search)
s at life's full span; But, dimmed and dwarfed, in times like these, The poet seems beside the man! So be it! let the garlands die, The singer's wreath, the painter's meed, Let our names perish, if thereby Our country may be saved and freed! 1864. Thomas Starr King. Published originally as a prelude to the posthumous volume of selections edited by Richard Frothingham. the great work laid upon his twoscore years Is done, and well done. If we drop our tears, Who loved him as few menud sorrow of the land, and tell That the brave sower saw his ripened grain. O East and West! O morn and sunset twain No more forever!—has he lived in vain Who, priest of Freedom, made ye one, and told Your bridal service from his lips of gold? 1864. Lines on a Fly-leaf. I need not ask thee, for my sake, To read a book which well may make Its way by native force of wit Without my manual sign to it. Its piquant writer needs from me No gravely masculine guaranty, And well might laugh her m
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Occasional Poems (search)
ies of the good behind And hopes of good before! And if, unknown to us, sweet days Of June like this must come, Unseen of us these laurels clothe The river-banks with bloom; And these green paths must soon be trod By other feet than ours, Full long may annual pilgrims come To keep the Feast of Flowers; The matron be a girl once more, The bearded man a boy, And we, in heaven's eternal June, Be glad for earthly joy! 1876. Hymn For the Opening of Thomas Starr King's House of Worship, 1864. The poetic and patriotic preacher, who had won fame in the East, went to California in 1860 and became a power on the Pacific coast. It was not long after the opening of the house of worship built for him that he died. amidst these glorious works of Thine, The solemn minarets of the pine, And awful Shasta's icy shrine,— Where swell Thy hymns from wave and gale, And organ-thunders never fail, Behind the cataract's silver veil,— Our puny walls to Thee we raise, Our poor reed-music soun
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), The tent on the Beach (search)
As the Celt said of purgatory, One might go farther and fare worse.” The Reader smiled; and once again With steadier voice took up his strain, While the fair singer from the neighboring tent Drew near, and at his side a graceful listener bent. 1864. The grave by the Lake. At the mouth of the Melvin River, which empties into Moultonboro Bay in Lake Winnipesaukee, is a great mound. The Ossipee Indians had their home in the neighborhood of the bay, which is plentifully stocked with fithat of her who bore him, Tender and most compassionate: “Never fear! For heaven is love, as God himself is love; Thy work below shall be thy work above.” And when he looked, lo! in the stern monk's place He saw the shining of an angel's face! 1864. The Traveller broke the pause. “I've seen The Brothers down the long street steal, Black, silent, masked, the crowd between, And felt to doff my hat and kneel With heart, if not with knee, in prayer, For blessings on their pious care.” The R