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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—secession. (search)
ly on all the citizens of the Union. A few figures will suffice to confirm this assertion. Of the volunteers who enlisted during the first year, only one-tenth were foreigners; of the remainder, two-thirds were born on American soil, and seven-thirtieths, or rather less than one-fourth, were naturalized Europeans. By examining separately the contingents of the Eastern States, where but a small number of emigrants settle, we find a still larger proportion of natives—a proportion which in 1864, when conscription was partially resorted to, reached as high as eighty per cent. This army, two-thirds of which consisted of native Americans, and only one-third of foreigners, was raised out of a population of about 19,000,000 souls. In order to ascertain which of these two elements supplied the largest proportion of men, we have only to compare the number of ablebodied men that each of them was able to contribute. The statistics of 1860 render this comparison impracticable; but the censu
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
rs when it rained, and in the evening spread out upon the damp ground, over which the shelter-tent was pitched. Consequently, the number of these Indiarubber garments, which in 1861 was forty thousand, rose to one million five hundred thousand in 1864; and it has been estimated that, placed alongside of each other, they would have presented a surface of one mile and a quarter square—that is to say, four times as large as the gardens of the Tuileries. The uniforms furnished to the volunteers n some of the Brooke guns the grooves were cut in inclined planes. The variety of the projectiles used with these guns was very great. A single Federal regiment—the First Connecticut Artillery—picked up, among the batteries in which it served in 1864 near Richmond, thirty-six different kinds of balls fired by the Confederates. During the long siege of Charleston the defenders of that place loaded their old smooth-bore brass pieces with projectiles of an elongated shape. Although the precisio<
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the first autumn. (search)
r-general, he could not resist the offer of a majorgeneral's epaulettes. Nevertheless, in donning the uniform, the warlike prelate took care to declare that he did not renounce either his holy calling or his episcopal functions, and he informed his flock that he should return to his diocese as soon as he had performed what he called his duties as a citizen. But he was destined to die as a soldier, and not as a bishop. He was killed by a cannon-ball on one of the battle-fields of Georgia in 1864, at the very moment when fortune was declaring in favor of his enemies. At the time of which we are speaking, Grant had been invested with a command altogether distinct from that of the Missouri— one which placed the rivers that unite near Cairo under his special charge. He occupied Cape Girardeau, Commerce, and Bird's Point, on the right bank of the Mississippi. His base of operations was at Cairo, in Illinois. After the neutrality of Kentucky had been violated he had taken possession
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Bibliographical note (search)
documents are far from being complete. The Navy Department of the Union has published the reports of all its officers in extenso; the War Department has only given abstracts of the reports of the Secretary and the commander-in-chief, and only the full reports of the quartermaster-general, which, in a statistical point of view, afford some curious information. A large number of the reports of both parties are to be found in the Rebellion Record; there were published besides, in Richmond, in 1864, two volumes of the reports of General Lee and his subordinates, and a few official Confederate documents were reprinted in New York in 1865. Among the numerous documents contained in the Richmond archives, subsequently taken to Washington after the war, there are several of which the author possesses copies, for which he is indebted to the kindness of General Grant. All the depositions received by the Joint Committee on the Conduct of the War have been collected into seven volumes which, a