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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,234 1,234 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 423 423 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 302 302 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 282 282 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 181 181 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 156 156 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 148 148 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 98 98 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 93 93 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 88 88 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for 1864 AD or search for 1864 AD in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President of the Confederate States of America. (search)
a, do issue this my Proclamation, calling upon the people of the said States, in conformity with the desire expressed by their representatives, to set apart Friday, the 8th day of April, as a day of Humiliation, Fasting and Prayer, and I do hereby invite them on that day to repair to their several places of public worship and beseech Almighty God to "preside over our public counsels and so inspire our armies and leaders with wisdom, courage, and perseverance; and so to manifest Himself in the greatness of His goodness and in the majesty of His power, that we may secure the blessings of an honorable peace and of free government; and that we, as a people, may ascribe all to the honor and glory of His name" Given under my hand and the seal of the Confederate States of America, at the city of Richmond, on this 12th day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four. Jefferson Davis. By the President: J. P. Benjamin, Secretary of State. mh 14--dtd
The Daily Dispatch: March 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Proclamation by the President of the Confederate States of America. (search)
The next Yankee Presidency. We take the following extracts from our late Northern files about the next Yankee Presidency. The New York Herald says: Mr. Chase has withdrawn from the field as a Presidential candidate for 1864. His patriotism, we are told, would not permit him to continue before the country as an aspirant for the succession, in view of the necessity of harmony and cohesion among the rank and file of the Administration party; but it appears, nevertheless, that his retirement from the contest with "Old Abe" is due to the discovery that Mr. Chase could not command a majority of his party even in the Ohio Legislature against "Old Abe." Assuming that this news of the backing out of the head of the Treasury is true, we may conclude that he and all his financial power will now be thrown into the seated of President Lincoln. But there is yet another Richmond in the field in the person of Gen. Fremont. Against Abraham Lincoln he stands somewhat in the position
ten to break, they would perhaps desire that the mass of the population should live and suffer, should beg and starve in sight of their old homes; that they should be made hewers of wood and drawers of water for their Yankee taskmasters. Death would be a refuge and repose in comparison with such torments, which they will not vouchsafe to the hated people, base envy of whose superior comfort and elevation of character is the great mainspring of this Satanic war. Soldiers of the South, in the hour of battle remember these things. Never had a people such wrongs to avenge, such evils to avert, such glorious rewards to gain. You are no longer deciding the question of African slavery — that is the fixed decree of Heaven; but the question is whether you and your children shall be slaves. Answer that question as freemen know how to answer it, and, with the blessing of God, the campaign of 1864 will accomplish your deliverance, and secure the independence of the Southern Confederacy.