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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 508 508 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 23 23 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 17 17 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 14 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 12 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 7 7 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for January, 1864 AD or search for January, 1864 AD in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1862., [Electronic resource], The production of saltpetre — something for every man to do. (search)
1862, but in order to induce its manufacture by our own people at home, has proposed to give fifty cents per pound for all that is made within the Confederacy until January, 1863 and for all made from artificial beds 50 cents per pound until January, 1864. When it is remembered that saltpetre is sold in Bengal at-three cents per pound, and actually taken in payment of taxes by Prussia and Sweden at six cents per pound, and that we have equal facilities with them for its manufacture, the liberalis way until the 1st of January, 1864. The propriety of the difference in price fixed by the Government will be obvious upon a moment's reflection. If it was proposed to purchase at fifty cents per pound all saltpetre delivered prior to January, 1864, and the blockade should be raised withing that period, importers could procure it abroad at six or seven cents, and realize incalculable profits. If all saltpetre made within the Confederacy, from nitrous earths, commanded the same price for