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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 31 31 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 30 30 Browse Search
Caroline E. Whitcomb, History of the Second Massachusetts Battery of Light Artillery (Nims' Battery): 1861-1865, compiled from records of the Rebellion, official reports, diaries and rosters 26 26 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
John D. Billings, The history of the Tenth Massachusetts battery of light artillery in the war of the rebellion 10 10 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for January 4th, 1864 AD or search for January 4th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 43.-the guerrillas in Kentucky. A proclamation by Governor Bramlette. Executive Department, Frankfort, Ky., January 4, 1864. The frequent outrages perpetrated in various parts of the State by lawless bands of marauders can, in a large degree, be traced to the active aid of rebel sympathizers in our midst, or their neglect to furnish to military commandants the information in their possession, which would lead to the defeat and capture of such marauders. Sympathizers with the rebellion who, while enjoying protection from the Government, abuse the leniency extended to them by concealing the movements of rebel guerrillas, by giving them information, affording them shelter, supplying them with provisions, and otherwise encouraging and fomenting private raids, are in criminal complicity with all the outrages perpetrated by the marauders whom they secretly countenance. It is in the power of persons whose sympathies are with the rebellion, to prevent guerrilla raids,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 49.-principles of the strong band. (search)
Doc. 49.-principles of the strong band. Office of the board of control, Chicago, ill., Jan. 14, 1864. At a meeting of the Board of Control of the Strong Band, held at their rooms on the fourth day of January, 1864, it was unanimously resolved, that the following be published as the aim, object, and intent of the Strong Band, to wit: The aim of the Strong Band is to assist the Federal Government in putting down the present infamous rebellion, in maintaining the Constitution of the United States, in enforcing the laws, and in reestablishing the Union on the basis of universal freedom, with the territorial boundaries it possessed before the revolt. The object of the Strong Band is to introduce into every department of the Government the most rigid system of retrenchment and reform, compatible with a vigorous and successful prosecution of the war; to restore the institutions of the Republic to their original purity, as founded by the patriots and sages of the Revolution, an