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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 19 19 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for February 1st, 1864 AD or search for February 1st, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 2: Barnstable County. (search)
r assistance to the soldiers' families. 1864. At a meeting held on the 25th of April, the town voted to raise the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars for each and every one of its quota called for by the President, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864; and that the sum be expended in refunding money paid by individual subscription, in procuring this town's proportion of troops called for at the aforesaid dates. Two other meetings were held during this year, but no change was made in the macapacity, in relation to the war. 1864. A legal town-meeting was held on the 9th of April, at which seventy-eight hundred dollars were appropriated to fill the quotas of the town under the calls of the President for men, Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. Mr. Colly, the town-clerk, writes:— I have sent you all the votes of importance relating to the war. Many other votes were passed, and much excitement existed during these years of trial; but they were so similar to the within, that to
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 4: Bristol County. (search)
n. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town, in its corporate capacity, in relation to the war during this year, although recruiting went on, and the payment of State aid to the soldiers' families continued as before. 1864. At the regular yearly meeting held April 4th, the town voted to raise twenty-six hundred and twenty-five dollars by taxation, for the purpose of procuring the quota of volunteers called for from the town of Norton by the President Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and for paying and refunding money which has already been paid and contributed in aid of and for the above purpose. Another meeting was held on the 11th of June, when it was voted to raise fifteen hundred dollars for the purpose of paying for the town's quota called for by the President March 4, 1864. 1865. The war being over, a special town-meeting was held June 24th, at which it was voted to raise by taxation four thousand dollars for paying and refunding money contributed by indiv
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
t 18th, Voted, to pay State aid to the families of drafted men the same as allowed and paid to the families of volunteers. November 3d, A committee of five was chosen to enlist volunteers to complete the quota of the town under the pending call of the President, with power to incur any necessary expense. 1864. April 4th, Three thousand dollars were appropriated to pay bounties to twenty-five men to fill the contingent of the town under the calls of the President of Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864. July 30th, The bounty to three-years volunteers was fixed at one hundred and twenty-five dollars, and so remained until the end of the war. Waltham furnished seven hundred men for the war, which was a surplus of seven over and above all demands. Twenty were commissioned officers. The whole amount of money appropriated and expended by the town on account of the war, exclusive of State aid, was fifty-two thousand five hundred and seventy-four dollars ($52,574.00). The amount of mon
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
, of Roxbury, the meeting dissolved. September 12th, Voted, to pay a bounty of one hundred dollars to each citizen of Sterling who shall enlist in the company forming in the town for nine months service. 1863. No action appears to have been taken by the town in its corporate capacity during this year in relation to the war. 1864. April 4th, Voted, to raise a sum equal to one hundred dollars per man of the quotas of this town under the orders of the President dated Oct. 17, 1863, and Feb. 1, 1864, and that from the money so raised there be refunded to each individual, who has contributed and paid any sum in aid of or for the purpose of obtaining the town's quotas under the said calls, the amount so contributed and paid by him. April 15th, Voted, to raise by loan seventeen hundred and fifty dollars to procure fourteen men to fill the quota of the town under the late call of the President for men. The town continued to raise money, recruit volunteers, and pay bounties to the end of