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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 18 18 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 9 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 7 7 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 4 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for February 5th, 1864 AD or search for February 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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match, have turned out to be a successful foraging expedition. The defences of Newbern are certainly of the most formidable description, and, from what we can learn, are well calculated to withstand the perils of any assault. The town is situated between two rivers, and the strip of land, not more than a mile wide, is said to be traversed by a deep ditch, twenty feet wide, with a gunboat stationed at each of its extremities. Official despatch from General Pickett. Kinston, February 5, 1864. To General S. Cooper: I made a reconnoissance within a mile and a half of Newbern, with Hoke's brigade and a part of Corse's and Clingman's, and some artillery; met the enemy in force at Bachelor's Creek; killed and wounded about one hundred in all; captured thirteen officers and two hundred and eighty prisoners, fourteen negroes, two rifled pieces and caissons, three hundred stand of small-arms, four ambulances, three wagons, fifty-five animals, a quantity of clothing, camp and gar
Doc. 70.-operations in West-Virginia. A national account. in the field, West-Virginia, February 5, 1864. The operations of the last seven days, although at times extremely varied in their character, have at last terminated in a series of successes that at once dispel the darksome clouds of temporary rebel prosperity, and open a bright vista to our true interests. The operations on both sides have been conducted with great rapidity, considering the mountainous condition of the country, the bad state of the roads, the time it requires to concentrate and move columns of troops, and the usual necessary features attendant upon a raiding and the repelling of a raid campaign. For some time past we had been in possession of information to the effect that General Early was concentrating troops and being reenforced in the neighborhood of Harrisonburgh, with a view to again attempting the capture of the garrison at Petersburgh, and then making another raid on the line of the B
I desire to see the lumber and turpentine trade on the St. John's River revived by loyal men, and for that purpose, and to give assurance that our occupation of this river is intended to be permanent, I have written to the Secretary of the Treasury, recommending that the port of Jacksonville be declared open. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Q. A. Gillmore, Major-General Commanding. Official despatches. [A.] headquarters Department of the South, Hilton head, S. C., Feb. 5, 1864, 9 P. M. Brigadier-General T. Seymour: General: You will start your command so as, if possible, to get the bulk of it at sea before daybreak. Steamers that have tows should be started as soon as they are ready. The whole are to rendezvous at the mouth of St. John's River by daybreak day after to-morrow morning, the seventh instant. I expect to be there in person at that time, but should I fail from any cause, you are expected to pass the bar on the Sunday morning's high-tide, ascend
to send an iron-clad or two. This move has had the effect of driving the guerrillas away from the Mississippi, as they are fearful it is intended to cut them off. I don't expect much from the expedition beyond diverting their attention. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Lieutenant E. K. Owen. United States steamer Marmora, four miles below Yazoo City, February 5, 1864. sir: I have the honor to report the arrival of the expedition at this place last evening. To-day has been spent in reconnoitring the enemy's position, and so far have discovered a battery of two small guns, situated in a valley seemingly perpendicularly to the river, aid also a heavy force of infantry and cavalry behind a hill to the right of the battery, and running parallel to the river. On the second, we arrived at Sartalia, and at ten A. M. of the third we attacked the enemy a