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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 14 14 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 6 6 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 5th, 1864 AD or search for March 5th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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and fourteen wounded, and the Fort Hindman was badly cut up with shot and shell, being struck twenty-seven times, but nothing to impair her efficiency. I inclose Lieutenant Commander Ramsay's report. I am well pleased with the result of the expedition. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington, D. C. Report of Lieutenant Commander F. A. Ramsay. United States steamship Choctaw, March 5, 1864. sir: In obedience to your order, I left here on the Fort Hindman at half-past 1 P. M. on the twenty-ninth ultimo, taking the Osage, Cricket, Ouachita, Lexington, and Conestoga with me, and proceeding up Red River, anchored at dark about fifteen miles from the mouth of Black River. At daylight on the first instant, I got under way and proceeded up Black River. At four P. M., when about fifteen miles below Trinity, we were fired into by sharp-shooters, concealed behind the levee. Al
ugee to his home. The quiet of thriving villages, when the old man on his crutch and the brave and war-worn veteran with his armless sleeve, shall tell of bloody battles and scenes of privation to smiling children around him. The quiet of prosperous cities, whose wharves shall whiten with an opulent commerce, whose shops shall hum with a busy industry, and whose spires point to that haven of rest which is far away. Then from a thousand happy hearts and happy homes shall arise thanksgiving and praise to the God of battles as of grace, while tears of gratitude will embalm the memories and bedew the graves of the brave men whose blood has been shed as a libation to liberty. A. D. Dickinson, Chairman, A. J. Marshall, Andrew Hunter, Senate Committee, B. H. Shackleford, Chairman, R. W. Hunter, F. B. Deane, A. C. Cummings, R. H. Baker, House Committee. Adopted by Senate, March 5, 1864. Shelton C. Davis, C. S. Adopted by House of Delegates, March 9, 1864. Wm. F. Gordon, C. H. D.
t in some two hundred and fifty prisoners of war, about as many refugees, nearly six thousand negroes, (several hundred of whom go into our army,) several hundred teams, with cattle, mules, horses, etc., in large numbers. We buried sixty rebels killed, and lost ten killed in action. Our losses were small, and mostly from stragglers and small foraging parties captured — in all not exceeding two hundred and fifty. B. Miner. A national account. on board the steamer Constitution, March 5, 1864. The expedition under the command of General Sherman set out from Vicksburgh on February third, in two columns, one under the command of General Hurlbut, proceeding by the old Jackson road, and crossing the Big Black by a pontoon-bridge at Messenger's Ferry; the other under command of General McPherson, crossing the river at the railroad bridge. In order to facilitate the progress of the army, all unnecessary baggage was left behind, the soldiers taking twenty days rations. The weat
l be ready for duty again wherever their services may be needed. Fortress Monroe, Va., Saturday, March 5, 1864. By referring to the foregoing account, and taking a look at the map, it will be seeOrdnance Train, Kilpatrick's Expedition. New-York Tribune account. Washington, Saturday, March 5, 1864. The much talked of raid by General Kilpatrick has ended with failure as to the main, who participated in the raid: detachment Fourth Pennsylvania cavalry, Yorktown, Va., March 5, 1864. dear Captain: Before this reaches you, you will have read in the newspapers the full accwe noticed Marshal Kane and Doctor Charles Magill. The death of Dahlgren. Richmond, March 5, 1864. The most important blow which has yet been struck the daring raiders who attempted to en party had in view, in making the late, and, to them, disastrous raid. Richmond Dispatch, March 5, 1864. Lieutenant Pollard, commanding company H, of the Ninth Virginia regiment, aided by some