Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for March 30th, 1864 AD or search for March 30th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), List of names of officers of the Signal Corps, Confederate States army. (search)
rganized under General Orders No. 40, A. & I. G. O., Richmond, May 29, 1862.] Memorandum of names of officers of the Signal Corps of the Confederate States Provisional army, appointed under the act of the Confederate Congress May 29, 1862, providing for the appointment of ten captains and ten sergeants. Captains. 1. R. H. T. Adams, S. O., A. & I. G. O., November 23, 1863. 2. James H. Alexander, S. O., A. & I. G. O., July 7, 1862. 3. William N. Barker, S. O., A. & I. G. O., March 30, 1864. 4. Thomas H. Clagett, S. O., A. & I. G. O., April 13, 1864. 5. M. T. Davidson, S. O., A. & I. G. O., June 9, 1862. 6. Elcan Jones, S. O., A. & I. G. O, February 3, 1864. 7. J. H. Manning, S. O., A. & I. G. O., June 10, 1862. 8. William Norris (promoted major and chief), S. O., A. & I. G. O., July 31, 1862. 9. M. L. Randolph, S. O., A. & I. G. O., November 12, 1862. 10. R. E. Wilbourne, S. O., A. & I. G. O., July 31, 1862. Sergeants. (appointed under acts of May
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of Colonel Edward McCrady, Jr. before Company a (Gregg's regiment), First S. C. Volunteers, at the Reunion at Williston, Barnwell county, S. C, 14th July, 1882. (search)
ries of the dead, and place above all others the name of the great chief of whom we have written. In strategy mighty, in battle terrible, in adversity as in prosperity a hero indeed. With the simple devotion to duty and the rare purity of the ideal Christian knight he joined all the kingly qualities of a leader of men. It was in one of these last terrible days, my comrades, that your first captain and your last colonel fell, mortally wounded. In the fight at Hatcher's Run, on the 30th March, 1864, Colonel C. W. McCreary was shot through the lungs and died as he was carried to the breastworks. I need not remind you how admirable a soldier he was, how brave in battle, how skilfully he could handle a regiment in action, and how gentle he was to all around him. Educated in the State Military Academy, he was fully prepared for the command of the regiment to which he succeeded and which he led so gallantly and successfully in many engagements. I can still hear his voice ringing thro