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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 823 823 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 46 46 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 38 38 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 25 25 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 19 19 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 16 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 10 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 6 6 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 4: The Cavalry (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for April, 1864 AD or search for April, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 38 results in 3 document sections:

By this accession, the Second Corps attained in April, 1864, an aggregate strength of 46,363, with 28,854 prehich some of the regiments suffered terribly. In April, 1864, the Tenth Corps was ordered to Virginia, where ihin the previous experience of the command. In April, 1864, the two divisions of the Eleventh Corps were broant its flag on the summit of the mountain. In April, 1864, the designation of the corps was changed to that accompanied Banks on his Red River Expedition of April, 1864. General McClernand was again in command of the cdivision served on Banks' Red River Expedition in April, 1864, the six regiments — formed into two brigades — bntry, and some skirmishing at the outposts. In April, 1864, the corps was concentrated at Yorktown, preparatthe reorganization of the Army of the Potomac, in April, 1864, Major-General Philip H. Sheridan was placed in ccavalry attached to Banks's Red River Expedition, April, 1864, was commanded by General Albert L. Lee, and comp
t only eight companies were organized up to April, 1864. These companies left the State April 28, ansfer of the Third Corps to the Second, in April, 1864, the brigade was placed in Mott's (4th) Divth, 125th and 126th, to which were added in April, 1864, the 52d and 57th; and, later on, the 7th Nmarble statute of their heroic colonel. In April, 1864, the Third Corps was ordered discontinued, in that battle, 6 killed and 32 wounded. In April, 1864, the corps number was changed to the TwentiFifth Corps, to which it was transferred in April, 1864. On joining the Fifth Corps, it was assignjoined the Army of the James at Yorktown in April, 1864, just prior to its departure for Bermuda Hue, where it fought at Missionary Ridge. In April, 1864, the Eleventh was transferred to Hooker's nquent march to the relief of Knoxville. In April, 1864, it was transferred to Robinson's (3d) Brign the discontinuance of the Third Corps, in April, 1864, this division was transferred to the Sixth[18 more...]
anger, intrepidity, heroic suffering, and death. Daring and Danger: by the Rev. William Pittinger (2d Ohio). The men who were detailed to carry out this wild romance were chosen from the 2d, 21st, and 33d Ohio Infantry. The 2d Ohio Cavalry was the leading regiment, in point of loss, in the mounted service of the State. General Kautz was at one time Colonel of this regiment. Its service was a varied one, fighting in the Indian Territory, Arkansas, Missouri, and East Tennessee until April, 1864, when it joined the Army of the Potomac. Its fallen heroes, buried where they fell, form a vidette-line of patriot graves from the Missouri to the Chesapeake. The 9th Ohio was composed of Germans, and was known as the First German or Prussian Regiment. At Chickamauga this regiment lost 48 killed, 185 wounded, and 16 missing; total, 249, out of about 500 engaged, and the heaviest loss but one of any regiment on the field. The 28th and 37th Ohio were also German Regiments. At Chapl