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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 46 46 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 14 14 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 6 6 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 6 6 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for April 8th, 1864 AD or search for April 8th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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t the 1st of March, 1864, General Banks came up the Mississippi river with gunboats, transports and an army of 30,000 or 40,000 troops and commenced a march up Red river. From what was afterward known, this course was adopted to reach the heart of Texas. It was reported, as one evidence of it, that the wagon train had in it scythes to reap the wheat. Walker's and Mouton's divisions and Tom Green's two brigades of cavalry impeded the Federal march up the river step by step until the 8th of April, 1864, giving time for a large number of Texas troops, and Missouri and Arkansas troops under General Price, to come in haste to their assistance. On the day named, General Price not having quite reached them, the battle of Mansfield was fought by the Texas and Louisiana troops under the command of Gen. Dick Taylor, the son of Old Rough-and-Ready President Taylor. From General Taylor's report it is learned that the following Texas forces were in the battle of Mansfield and that of Pleasa
a section of the Valverde battery, was attacked on the Natchitoches road by cavalry, infantry and artillery. He fell back slowly toward Pleasant Hill, skirmishing briskly. Colonel Bagby lost some 25 or 30 killed and wounded, and inflicted probably more loss on the enemy. His conduct was, as always, that of a brave and skillful soldier. The following quotations from the report of Maj.-Gen. Richard Taylor describe the part taken by Texans in the victories at Mansfield and Pleasant Hill, April 8 and 9, 1864: In the morning of the 8th, I moved down to the position selected for the troops. Walker's division occupied the right of the road, facing Pleasant Hill; Buchel's and Terrell's regiments of cavalry, under Brigadier-General Bee, on its right; Mouton's division on the left of the road, with Major's division of cavalry, consisting of his own and Bagby's brigades (dismounted), on Mouton's left. Debray's regiment of cavalry was held in the road a little to the rear. Haldeman's
and equipped 8,000 men, and, in 1864, with these troops, advanced to the assistance of Gen. Sterling Price during the Red river campaign. At Poison Spring, on April 8, 1864, he made a most brilliant and effective attack on a part of the army of Gen. Frederick Steele, and captured the Federal wagon train and many prisoners. This v department, wrote to the war department at Richmond, asking the promotion of Col. Horace Randal to the rank of brigadier-general. At the battle of Mansfield, April 8, 1864, Randal fought under the eye of Gen. Richard Taylor, who said of him: In vigor, energy and daring, Randal surpassed my expectations, high as they were of him ane brigade. This high opinion was strengthened by Randal's conduct on the 9th, at Pleasant Hill The commission of brigadier-general conferred upon him, dated April 8, 1864, was an honor that had been well earned. He did not, however, receive the news of his promotion, for he fell, mortally wounded, in the battle of Jenkins' Ferr