hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 3 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 2 2 Browse Search
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for April 18th, 1864 AD or search for April 18th, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 1 result in 1 document section:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 40: (search)
the peace party in the North, and influence the coming Presidential election. Then, too, their victories, much exaggerated, would sound well abroad, and perhaps bring aid from the English and French Governments. It was clearly the duty of the Federal Government never to fall back from a position so easily to be held with Monitors and gun-boats as the sounds of North Carolina; yet, for want of proper precautions on the part of the Government, the enemy besieged Plymouth. On the 18th of April, 1864, the Confederates opened with artillery upon Fort Gray, and in the afternoon, directing a heavy fire upon the town of Plymouth, the battle became general all along the line. The enemy assaulted the works with great gallantry, Lieutenant-Commander Charles W. Flusser. but were driven back by the aid of the gun-boats Miami and Southfield, under Lieutenant-Commander Flusser. A message was sent from General Wessels to Lieutenant-Commander Flusser, acknowledging the value of the Navy's s