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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 545 545 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 19 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for May, 1864 AD or search for May, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
rapidly forward, and, on the morning of the 5th, May, 1864. crossed the Rapid Anna at Germania Ford, and joindvance was begun early in the morning of the 5th. May, 1864. Preparations for it had not been unobserved by thof advance, and, early on the morning of the 5th, May, 1864. he had thrown out the division of Griffin on the rrived before daybreak on the morning of the 6th; May, 1864. and Longstreet, arriving before midnight of the 5ent out at daybreak on Saturday morning, the 7th. May, 1864. Grant had no desire to renew the conflict there, readiness for battle on the morning of the 10th. May, 1864. By a movement the previous evening, having for itt was cut in two. On the morning of the 13th, May, 1864. the Confederates were behind an inner and shorterntense anxiety and cheering hope; and on the 9th, May 1864. when the Army of the Potomac had passed The Wilde Mat-ta-po-ny. crossed the North Anna on the 9th, May, 1864. and struck the Virginia Central railway at Beaver
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
n studying the great and decisive campaign we are now considering. and they made preparations accordingly. They were quickly undeceived, but not until it was too late to prevent the mischief wrought by the deception. On the night of the 4th, May, 1864. transports, sent up from Hampton Roads, conveyed Butler's army around to the James River, and by dawn the next morning, artillery and infantry, to the number of thirty-five thousand men, accompanied by a squadron of war vessels, under Admiral re-enforcements from reaching Lee from the south; and his first effort for that purpose was to destroy the railway between Richmond and Petersburg, lying at an average of about three miles from his line of intrenchments. So early as the 6th, May, 1864. he sent out General Heckman to reconnoiter that road, and on the 7th five brigades, under General Brooks, advanced upon the Port Walthall branch of the railway, not far from the junction, Port Walthall is on the left bank of the Appomattox
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 22: prisoners.-benevolent operations during the War.--readjustment of National affairs.--conclusion. (search)
n inevitable chain of causes and effects, Providence punishes national sins by national calamities. --a depravity which culminated after a career of two hundred years or more, in what Blackstone declares to be the sum of all wickedness denounced in the Decalogue, namely, treason. Proofs from ten thousand tongues certify and justify the conclusions of a National Senator (Howard), who, while holding in his hand the report of a Committee appointed by the United States Sanitary Commission in May, 1864, This Committee was composed of Doctors Valentine Mott and Edward Delafield, and Gouverneur Morris. Wilkins, of New York, and Doctor Ellerslie Wallace, Hon. John J. Clark Hare, and Rev. Treadwell Walden of Philadelphia. They were appointed by the Commission for ascertaining, by inquiry and investigation, the true physical condition of prisoners recently discharged, by exchange, from confinement at Richmond and elsewhere within the rebel lines; whether they did, in fact, during such con
and Shields in, 2.368; operations of Banks, Jackson, Ewell, and Fremont in, 2.389-2.399; rapid retreat of Gen. Banks down, 2.392-2.394; visit of the author to. in 1866, 3.372, 400; Sheridan's operations in, to the battle of Cedar Creek, 3.363-3.372; Sheridan's raid in, from Winchester to Lynchburg, 3.534. Shepherdstown, cavalry fight at, between Gregg and Fitzhugh Lee, 3.98. Sheridan, Gen. Philip H., at the battle on Missionaries' Ridge, 3.167; raid of against Lee's communications in May, 1864, 3.312; raids of against railways in Lee's rear, 3.332; succeeds Hunter in command of the Middle Military Division, 3.350, operations of till the battle of Cedar Creek, 3.363-3.372; his raid from Winchester to Grant's lines, 3.534-3.536; at the battle of Five Forks, 3.542; Lee's retreat cut off by, 3.557. Sherman, Gen. T. W., in command of land forces in. the Port Royal expedition, 2.115; relieved by Gen. Hunter in command of the Southern Department, 2.319; at the siege of Port Hudson,