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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 545 545 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 19 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for May, 1864 AD or search for May, 1864 AD in all documents.

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Professor of History in the College of the City of New York A Union sentry at Libby in 1865—Confederate prisoners Prisoners of war in fort Delaware, May, 1864: brave and Distin-Guished southneners in a Union prison. Captain Hart Gibson (No. 4) was serving at the time of his capture as assistant adjutant-general on Gsoon promoted, served to the end of the war, though for a few months he was transferred west of the Distant view of Belle Plain Camp of Confederate prisoners, May, 1864 This photograph was taken just after the Spotsylvania campaign, in the course of which Grant lost thirty-six thousand men in casualties but captured several t with little interruption to the end of hostilities in April. Where five thousand Confederate prisoners lay encamped: a scene after the battle of Spotsylvania—May, 1864 On the heights above the hollow the Union sentries can be descried against the sky-line. The cluster of huts on the right-hand page is part of the Federal ca
862. After the suspension of the agreement to exchange prisoners, May 25, 1863, the numbers in confinement began to exceed the provision made for them, and in May, 1864, some barracks on the Chemung River near Elmira, New York, were enclosed for prison purposes. Before the end of August, the number of prisoners reached almost t in front is covered with tents under which a considerable part of the Confederate prisoners were accommodated until the winter. The Elmira Prison was opened in May, 1864. Before the end of August the prisoners there numbered almost ten thousand. Conditions here were always bad, partly on account of the insufficient shelter, ande fought, the number of Confederate prisoners increased very rapidly and further accommodation was necessary. These barracks were chosen to serve as a prison in May, 1864. The first detachment of Confederate prisoners arrived there July 6th, 649 in number. During the month of July, 1864, 4,424 more were brought; during August, 5
s Army Prayer with the wounded after Spotsylvania The photographer of May, 1864, preserved a moment breathing the devout spirit of Millets Angelus. the Surg, Virginia A sanitary-commission nurse and her patients at Fredericksburg, May, 1864 More of the awful toll of 36,000 taken from the Union army during the terrltitude of other conditions. With the wounded of Spotsylvania Court House, May, 1864 Examining the lawn closely, one perceives belts and bandages strewn everywe wake of Grant's advance: a warehouse used as a hospital after Spotsylvania, May, 1864 This picture shows a warehouse on the banks of the Rappahannock to which wr without assistance. Union hand-stretchers at work at Marye's heights in May, 1864 Over fifty thousand hand-stretchers of various patterns were issued by thein Bates, of the Third Army Corps, near Brandy Station. The following month (May, 1864) the Army of the Potomac moved to the front under General Grant in his decisi
oberts, M. D.,, Surgeon, Confederate States Army Prayer with the wounded after Spotsylvania The photographer of May, 1864, preserved a moment breathing the devout spirit of Millets Angelus. the Surgeon's assistants, heads bared, and the nursion, second army corps, at Brandy Station, Virginia A sanitary-commission nurse and her patients at Fredericksburg, May, 1864 More of the awful toll of 36,000 taken from the Union army during the terrible Wilderness campaign. The Sanitary Co variously attributed to dampness and a multitude of other conditions. With the wounded of Spotsylvania Court House, May, 1864 Examining the lawn closely, one perceives belts and bandages strewn everywhere. These recumbent figures tell more p lying in the shade of the house. In the wake of Grant's advance: a warehouse used as a hospital after Spotsylvania, May, 1864 This picture shows a warehouse on the banks of the Rappahannock to which wounded have been conveyed after the slaugh
specially intended for rough country where wheeled vehicles could not readily go. Wounded able to walk were expected to make their own way back to the surgeon, with or without assistance. Union hand-stretchers at work at Marye's heights in May, 1864 Over fifty thousand hand-stretchers of various patterns were issued by the Union Government during the war. It was by means of them that the removal of the helpless wounded from the battlefield was effected. The best pattern of hand-stretchround of this photograph stand seven ambulances and two quartermasters' wagons, being prepared for active service in the field. The scene is the headquarters of Captain Bates, of the Third Army Corps, near Brandy Station. The following month (May, 1864) the Army of the Potomac moved to the front under General Grant in his decisive campaign from the Wilderness onward. A large quantity of stores lie upon the ground near the quartermasters' wagons ready for transportation to the front. As it b