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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 545 545 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 19 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for May, 1864 AD or search for May, 1864 AD in all documents.

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University. fluous any reference to Roman stoicism. With the spring he girded himself to meet his future conqueror, Grant, in campaigns which proved that, although he himself could be finally crushed by weight of numbers, he was nevertheless the greater master of the art of war. Grant's army was nearly twice as large as that of Lee, but this superiority was almost neutralized by the fact that he was taking the offensive in the tangled region known as the Wilderness. The fighting throughout May and June, 1864, literally defies description. Grant at last had to cease maneuvering and to fight his way out to a junction with Butler on the James. He would attack time and again with superb energy, only to be thrown back with heavy losses. Lee used his advantage of fighting on interior lines and his greater knowledge of the country, and so prevented any effective advance on Richmond. Finally, after the terrible slaughter at Cold Harbor, he forced Grant to cease hammering. Yet, after a
ss, Va., May 5-7, 18642,24612,1373,38317,666Reports of losses not complete Spotsylvania, Va., May 10, 18647533,3474,100Reports incomplete Spotsylvania, Va., May 12, 18646,0208006,820Records of losses not shown Drewry's Bluff, Va., May 12-16, 18643902,3801,3904,160Reports incomplete Cold Harbor, Va., June 1-3, 186412,000Reports incomplete Petersburg, Va., June 15-30, 18642,0139,9354,62116,569Estimated loss in Hill's Corps and Field and Kershaw's divisions, 2,970 Atlanta Campaign, Ga., May, 1864 (including Buzzard's Roost, Snake Creek Gap and New Hope Church´╝ë1,0581,2402,298Killed and wounded, 9,187 Assault on Kenesaw Mt., Ga., June 27, 18641,999522,051270172342 Tupelo, Miss., July 13-15, 186477559386742101,1161,326 Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 (Hood's attack)4301,5991,7333,7222,8902,8908513,741 Jonesboro, Ga., Aug. 31, 18641791,640 Jonesboro, Ga., Sept. 1, 18642339461051,274No full return of losses Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 18646973,9833385,0182761,8271,8183,921 Chaffin's F
s on special duty in the North and East. In May, 1864, with the rank of majorgeneral of volunteersin from February 17th to March 24, 1864. In May, 1864, he was mustered out of the volunteer servic at Fair Oaks. He resigned from the army in May, 1864, and went to California. He died in Nice, F of the Nineteenth Army Corps, serving until May, 1864, and was wounded at Sabine Cross Roads on ths promoted to major-general of volunteers in May, 1864. He served on several important commissionsReynolds in December, 1864. For a year from May, 1864, the corps was a unit of the Military Divisiportion of the Twenty-second Army Corps. In May, 1864, he was assigned to a division in the Eighteassistance in the relief of Chattanooga. In May, 1864, he took command of the Eighteenth Corps in harge of the defenses of New Orleans, and in May, 1864, he assumed command of the Nineteenth Army Cght wing of Major-General Banks' forces. In May, 1864, he was given a division in the Eighteenth A[1 more...]
f May. In 1863, he defended Charleston, and after May, 1864, cooperated with Lee in the defense of Petersburg lonel, rising to the rank of lieutenant-general in May, 1864. He commanded a brigade at Bull Run, was wounded After the death of Major-General J. E. B. Stuart, May, 1864, Major-General (later Lieutenant-General) Wade Hamnd Dalton, Georgia, and faced Sherman's advance in May, 1864, in two infantry and one cavalry corps. Polk brou of Tennessee, took part in the Atlanta campaign from May to July 18, 1864, when he succeeded Johnston in the ch he called the Army of Mississippi, to Georgia in May, 1864, to assist Johnston in opposing Sherman's advance isiana, and fought at Tupelo and other places. In May, 1864, he succeeded Lieutenant-General Polk at the head unt of criticism resulting from the surrender. In May, 1864, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, he was giventreet and fought at Chickamauga and Knoxville. In May, 1864, he was sent to Georgia and South Carolina and bei