hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 545 545 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 33 33 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 32 32 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 25 25 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 24 24 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 19 19 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 18 18 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 17 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 13 13 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for May, 1864 AD or search for May, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 24 document sections:

1 2 3
d. General Rufus King led a troop of cavalry that destroyed railroads and bridges to within 30 or 40 miles of Richmond. Pope's troops were posted along a line from Fredericksburg to Winchester and Harper's Ferry, and were charged with the threefold duty of covering the national capital, guarding the valley entrance into Maryland in the rear of Washington, and threatening Richmond from the north as a diversion in favor of McClellan. When General Grant began his march against Richmond (May, 1864), Gen. Benjamin F. Butler was in command of the Army of the James, and was directed to co-operate with the Army of the Potomac. Butler prepared to make a vigorous movement against Richmond from the south, while Grant moved from the north. Butler's effective force was about 40,000 men when he was ordered to advance. It was composed chiefly of the 18th Army Corps, commanded by Gen. W. F. Smith, and the 10th Corps, under Gen. Q. A. Gillmore, who arrived at Fort Monroe May 3. Butler succes
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Joseph, 1827- (search)
Bailey, Joseph, 1827- Military officer; born in Salem, O., April 28, 1827; entered the Union army as a private in 1861; acquired great fame by his skill in damming the Red River at Alexandria (May, 1864), by which the squadron of iron-clad gunboats, under Admiral Porter, was enabled to pass down the rapids there when the water was low. He had been a lumberman in Wisconsin, and in that business had learned the practical part which he used in his engineering at Alexandria, where he was acting chief-engineer of the 19th Army Corps. Other engineers said his proposition to .dam the river was absurd, but in eleven days the boats, by his method, passed safely down. For this achievement he was promoted to colonel, brevetted brigadier-general, voted the thanks of Congress, and presented with a sword and $3,000 by the officers of the fleet. He settled in Missouri after the war, where he was a formidable enemy of the bushwhackers, and was shot by them in Nevada, in that State, on March 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
ad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field on General Grant's staff, from May, 1864, until Lee's surrender at Appomattox in April, 1865. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general, U. S. A. He published The Gyroscopc and Pr, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field on General Grant's staff, from May, 1864, until Lee's surrender at Appomattox in April, 1865. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general, U. S. A. He published The Gyroscopc and Problems in rotary motions, which evince profound mathematical investigation; also other works concerning the Civil War and its operations. The degree of Ll.D. was conferred upon him by Yale College. He died in Detroit, Mich., May 14, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Beauregard, Pierre Gustave toutant, (search)
ic firesides, to rally to the standard of their State and country, and by every means in their power compatible with honorable warfare, to drive back and expel the invaders from the land. The speech of President Davis at Richmond and this proclamation of Beauregard were lauded by the Confederates at Washington and Baltimore as having the ring of true metal. After the battle of Bull Run (q. v.), in July, he was promoted to major-general. He took command of the Army of the Mississippi, under Gen. A. S. Johnston, and directed the battle of Shiloh in April, 1862, after the death of Johnston. He successfully defended Charleston in 1862-63, and in May, 1864, he joined Lee in the defence of Petersburg and Richmond. As commander of the forces in the Carolinas in 1865, he joined them with those of Gen. J. E. Johnston, and surrendered them to Sherman. At the close of the war, with the full rank of general in the Confederate service, he settled in New Orleans, where he died, Feb. 20, 1893.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bermuda hundred, operations near. (search)
Bermuda hundred, operations near. General Butler had intrenched a greater portion of the Army of the James at Bermuda Hundred, at the junction of the James and Appomattox rivers, early in May, 1864, to co-operate with the Army of the Potomac, approaching from the north. His chief care was at first to prevent reinforcements being sent to Lee from Petersburg and the South. For this purpose Butler proceeded to destroy the railway between Petersburg and Richmond, and so to cut off direct communication between the Confederate capital and the South. When it was known that General Gillmore had withdrawn his troops from before Charleston to join Butler, Beauregard was ordered to hasten northward to confront the Army of the James. He had arrived at Petersburg, and was hourly reinforced. Some of these troops he massed in front of Butler, under Gen. D. H. Hill; and finally, on the morning of May 16, under cover of a dense fog, they attempted to turn Butler's right flank. A sharp confl
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Canby, Edward Richard Sprigg 1819- (search)
Canby, Edward Richard Sprigg 1819- Military officer; born in Kentucky in 1819; graduated at West Point in 1839; served in the Seminole War (q. v.) and the war with Mexico. He was twice brevetted for eminent services in the latter Edward R. S. Canby war. He was promoted to major in 1855, and colonel in 1861. In 1861 he was in command in New Mexico until late in 1862, and in March of that year was made brigadier-general of volunteers. He was promoted to major-general of volunteers in May, 1864, and took command of the Department of West Mississippi. He captured Mobile, April 12, 1865, and afterwards received the surrender of the Confederate armies of Generals Taylor and E. Kirby Smith. On July 28, 1866, he was commissioned a brigadier-general in the regular army, and in 1869 took command of the Department of the Columbia, on the Pacific coast. He devoted himself to the settlement of difficulties with the Modoc Indians (q. v.), and, while so doing, was treacherously murdered
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), City Point, (search)
City Point, On the James River at the mouth of the Appomattox, near Petersburg, Va. In May, 1864, General Butler seized this place, which became the principal base of supplies for the army operating against Richmond under General Grant, who made City Point his headquarters.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Easton, Langdon Cheves, 1814-1884 (search)
Easton, Langdon Cheves, 1814-1884 Military officer; born in St. Louis, Mo., Aug. 10, 1814; graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1838; and served in the Florida, Mexican, and Civil wars. In December, 1863, he was appointed chief quartermaster of the Army of the Cumberland; and in May, 1864, was assigned the same post in the army under General Sherman. He received the brevet of major-general in March, 1865; retired in January, 1881. He died in New York City, April 29, 1884.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Habeas corpus, (search)
pts to arrest him, but fails.]May 25, 1861 Theophilus Parsons supports President's power to suspendJune 5, 1861 Attorney-General Bates asserts the President's power to declare martial law and suspend the writ of habeas corpusJuly 5, 1861 One hundred and seventy-four persons committed to Fort Lafayette,July to Oct., 1861 Suspension of the writ made generalSept. 24, 1862 Congress by act upholds this powerMarch 3, 1863 Vallandigham arrestedMay 4 1863 President suspends by proclamationSept. 15, 1863 All persons held under suspension of the writ dischargedMay, 1864 Suspends in KentuckyJuly 5, 1864 President Johnson restores the writ of habeas corpus except in the late insurrectionary States, District of Columbia, New Mexico, and Arizona, by proclamationDec. 11, 1865 In all States and Territories except TexasApril 2, 1866 Throughout the United StatesAug. 20, 1866 Thirty-eight thousand arrests were made according to the provost-marshal's record, Washington, during the Civil War.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hartranft, John Frederick 1830-1889 (search)
Hartranft, John Frederick 1830-1889 Military officer; born in New Hanover, Montgomery co., Pa., Dee. 16, 1830; graduated at Union College in 1853, and admitted to the bar in 1859. He commanded the 4th Pennsylvania (three months) regiment; then organized the 51st Pennsylvania Regiment, and as its colonel accompanied Burnside's expedition to North Carolina early in 1862. He was in all the operations of that corps (the 9th), and was made brigadier-general in May, 1864. At Antietam he led the famous charge that carried the lower bridge (see Antietam, battle of), and was in command of the division of the 9th Corps that gallantly recaptured Fort Steadman, before Petersburg, in March, 1865, for which he was brevetted majorgeneral. He was elected governor of Pennsylvania in 1872 and 1875; pursued a vigorous policy during the great railroad strikes in July, 1877; was appointed major-general commanding the State militia in 1879; and was afterwards postmaster and collector of the port i
1 2 3