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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 25 25 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 7 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for May 4th, 1864 AD or search for May 4th, 1864 AD in all documents.

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eir country's service. They have been the most loyal, devoted, and earnest men. Even on the last days of their lives they have said that all they hoped for was just to live and enter the ranks again and meet their foes. It is a most glorious record in reference to the devotion of our men to their country. I do not think their patriotism has ever been equalled in the history of the world. All of which is respectfully submitted. B. F. Wade, Chairman. war Department, Washington City, May 4, 1864. sir: I have the honor to submit to you a report made to this department by Colonel Hoffman, Commissary General of prisoners, in regard to the condition of Union soldiers who have, until within a few days, been prisoners of war at Richmond, and would respectfully request that your Committee immediately proceed to Annapolis to take testimony there, and examine with their own eyes the condition of those who have been returned from rebel captivity. The enormity of the crime committed by
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. (search)
Capture of the steamers Covington and Signal. Report of Acting Volunteer Lieut. G. P. Lord. United States steamer Chillicothe, above Alexandria falls, May 8, 1864. sir: It is with feelings of regret that I report the loss of the United States steamer Covington, and most respectfully submit the following report: I left Alexandria, convoying the steamer Warner, at eight o'clock on the morning of May fourth, 1864. While passing Wilson's plantation, the Warner was fired into by about one hundred infantry, losing one man. I fired my stern guns at them for some time, and passed on. After proceeding about one mile and a half further, Mr. McClossy, a pilot belonging to the General Price, struck the stern of the vessel against a bar, thereby breaking the port-rudder badly and shivering the tiller. I told him hereafter, Mr. Emerson, my other pilot, would manage her. I tied up all night about a mile from the Red House, and commenced repairing my rudder and tiller. At about five