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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 566 566 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 45 45 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 24 24 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 14 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 13 13 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 10 10 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies. You can also browse the collection for May 6th, 1864 AD or search for May 6th, 1864 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

int in controversy, and which I shall consider at present, is this statement made in my official report: On the 6th of May, 1864, the Army lay at and near Dalton, awaiting the advance of the enemy. Never had so large a Confederate Army been asshe force at and near Dalton, or as I expressed it in my official report, In the easy direction of a single commander, May 6th, 1864. It must be admitted that in order to estimate the loss of an Army during any campaign, siege, or battle, it is necern now in the possession of Major General Wheeler, a copy of which this officer furnished me on the 2d May, 1874: May 6th, 1864. General field and staff and company officers present, five hundred and twenty-five (525); total effective fighting strenuously labored to show that there were not seventy thousand (70,000) available troops at and near Dalton on the 6th of May, 1864. I claim, however, that I have, by figures and official data, demonstrated to any unbiassed mind that they were ava
look at its history during the three months which preceded the day on which I was ordered to its command. To do this, it is necessary either to state in this report all the facts which illustrate the entire operations of the Army of Tennessee in the recent campaign, or to write a supplemental or accompanying report. I deem the former more appropriate, and will therefore submit in a single paper all the information which seems to me should be communicated to the Government. On the 6th of May, 1864, the Army lay at and near Dalton awaiting the advance of the enemy. Never had so large a Confederate Army assembled in the West. Seventy thousand (70,000) effective men were in the easy direction of a single commander, whose good fortune it was to be able to give successful battle, and redeem the losses of the past. Extraordinary efforts had been used to secure easy victory. The South had been denuded of troops to fill the strength of the Army of Tennessee. Mississippi and Alabama