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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 21 21 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 8 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 7 7 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 5 5 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 5 5 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 5 5 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
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son. This seems darkly mysterious to us, but God's will be done. The funeral took place this evening, from St. James's Church. My duty to the living prevented my attending it, for which I am very sorry; but I was in the hospital from three o'clock until eight, soothing the sufferers in the only way I could, by fanning them, bathing their wounds, and giving them a word of comfort. Mr. and others of our household were at the funeral. They represent the scene as being very imposing. May 14th, 1864. The cavalry fight on the Chickahominy was very severe. The Yankees escaped on Thursday night; they should not have been allowed to get off. Our sad deficiency in numbers is always in our way. The death of another of our beloved E. H. S. boys has shocked us greatly — I mean that of Colonel Robert Randolph, of Fauquier, for a long time the chivalric captain of the famous Black horse company. After fighting desperately for hours, he was ordered to change his position; he immediate
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
May 6-7, 1864.Skirmishes at Tunnel Hill. May 7, 1864.Skirmish at Varnell's Station. Skirmish near Nickajack Gap. May 8-11, 1864.Demonstration against Rocky Face Ridge, with combats at Buzzard Roost or Mill Creek Gap, and Dug Gap. May 8-13, 1864.Demonstration against Resaca, with combats at Snake Creek Gap, Sugar Valley, and near Resaca. May 9-13, 1864.Demonstration against Dalton, with combats near Varnell's Station (9th and 12th) and at Dalton (13th). May 13, 1864.Skirmish at Tilton. May 14-15, 1864.Battle of Resaca. May 15, 1864.Skirmish at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd's Spring. May 17, 1864.Engagement at Adairsville. Action at Rome. Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
near the base of Rocky Face, and my corps marching by an intermediate road. We skirmished with the enemy during the day, and encamped at dark about eight miles south of Dalton. Soon after we opened communication with the rest of the army before Resaca, happily finding that we were only one mile from General Schofield's left flank. Instructions were received from Major-General Thomas, at 5.15 on the morning of May 14, to wit: headquarters Department of the Cumberland, In the Field, May 14, 1864. Major-General Howard, Commanding Fourth Army Corps: General: You will move your troops down the main roads toward Resaca until you form a junction with the rest of the army, when further orders will be given you. Report your approach when you get within sight of the troops in your front. Very respectfully, yours, &c., Geo. H. Thomas, Major-General, Commanding. These instructions were substantially the same as those I had already issued to my command during the night.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 41 (search)
No. 37. report of Maj. Thomas W. Motherspaw, Seventy-third Illinois Infantry. Hdqrs. Seventy-Third Illinois Infantry Vols., Atlanta, Ga., September 11, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my command in the recent campaign: The Seventy-third Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers marched from Cleveland, Tenn., May 3, 1864, numbering about 250 guns; was engaged in action at Resaca, Ga., May 14 and 15; at Adairsville May 17; in various skirmishes from Dallas to Kenesaw Mountain; in the action of June 27 at Kenesaw; that of July 20 at Peach Tree Creek; in the operations before Atlanta from July 22 to August 26, and in the engagement at Jonesborough, Ga., on September 1. The casualties in the command have been 2 commissioned officers wounded, 16 enlisted men killed or died of wounds, and 37 wounded, making a total of 55. To my officers and men I return my hearty thanks for their prompt obedience to my orders and ready per
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 55 (search)
No. 51. report of Col. Emerson Opdycke, one hundred and twenty-fifth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 3-14. headquarters 125TH Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. Captain: I have the honor of submitting the following report of my regiment from May 3 to May 14, 1864, at which time the command fell upon Lieut. Col. D. H. Moore, I having since then been in command of a demi-brigade or a brigade: May 3, I moved with the brigade at 12 m. from Cleveland, Tenn., toward Dalton, Ga., with an aggregate of 500 officers and men, fully equipped for an active campaign. We bivouacked at 7.30 p. m. after a march of about fourteen miles. May 4, the march was resumed at 6 a. m. As we were near the enemy the march was slow. Halted at about seven miles from Tunnel Hill and commenced throwing up works, but after dusk we changed positions and occupied a ridge that led down to Catoosa Springs. May 5 was spent in throwing up defensive works along the crest of the ridge.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 56 (search)
place early in the day and gained advantage over him, the Fourth Army Corps was ordered to its assistance, but arrived too late in the day to be available. The One hundred and twenty-fifth, in the front line on the extreme left, went into position at dark after slight skirmishing with scattering cavalry, extended our pickets so as to inclose a rebel hospital containing three surgeons, several nurses and attendants, and 150 rebel wounded. September 2, pursued the enemy to Lovejoy's Station, confronted him on the 3d and 4th, and marched to Atlanta on the 5th, 6th, and 7th. September 8, went into camp two miles northeast of the city near the Augusta railroad. Casualties since May 14, 1864: Killed, commissioned officers, 5; enlisted men, 27. Wounded, commissioned officers, 9; enlisted men, 107. Aggregate, 148. Very respectfully, yours, &c., D. H. Moore, Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding Regiment. Capt. George I. Waterman, A. A. A. G., Third Brig., Second Div., 4th Army Corps.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 119 (search)
e regiment participated in the advance on, and occupation of, Tunnel Hill, the enemy retiring to Buzzard Roost Gap. May 9, advanced on Buzzard Roost with the brigade, driving the enemy's skirmishers and occupying an advanced position under a heavy fire of artillery, losing in this advance and position 2 enlisted men killed, 3 officers and 11 enlisted men wounded. May 12, marched from Buzzard Roost, passing through Snake Creek Gap, and participating with the brigade in the advance on Resaca, May 14 and 15, without loss. May 16, commenced pursuit of the enemy, passing through Calhoun, Adairsville, and Kingston, crossing Etowah River at Island Ford, May 23, taking position, May 26, in front of enemy's works near Dallas. May 27, moved with brigade and division, supporting General Wood's division, Fourth Army Corps, passing to the front and left, striking the enemy on Little Pumpkin Vine Creek, the brigade advancing on the left of said division; the Thirty-eighth, with First Wisconsin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
e did not reach the crest of the hill until after the failure of Major-General Schofield's right and my left had become known, and I did not have it advance farther. Our whole line, from the right of the Twentieth Corps to the left of the Twenty-third, continued to occupy this ridge during the afternoon, and, having placed numerous batteries in position, shelled the rebel works with fine effect. The loss which my command sustained in the operations of this day was as follows: Casualties May 14, 1864-killed, 2 officers and 14 enlisted men; wounded, 7 officers and 112 enlisted men; total, 9 officers and 126 enlisted men. During the day the Third Brigade, with the exception of the Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, which remained to garrison Ringgold, came up and was placed in reserve behind the other brigades. On the morning of the 15th my division was withdrawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the corps to aid in filling a gap caused by Major-General Hooker bei
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
e did not reach the crest of the hill until after the failure of Major-General Schofield's right and my left had become known, and I did not have it advance farther. Our whole line, from the right of the Twentieth Corps to the left of the Twenty-third, continued to occupy this ridge during the afternoon, and, having placed numerous batteries in position, shelled the rebel works with fine effect. The loss which my command sustained in the operations of this day was as follows: Casualties May 14, 1864-killed, 2 officers and 14 enlisted men; wounded, 7 officers and 112 enlisted men; total, 9 officers and 126 enlisted men. During the day the Third Brigade, with the exception of the Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, which remained to garrison Ringgold, came up and was placed in reserve behind the other brigades. On the morning of the 15th my division was withdrawn from the line and sent to the extreme right of the corps to aid in filling a gap caused by Major-General Hooker bei
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Opposing Sherman's advance to Atlanta. (search)
led, with orders to leave two divisions midway between the two places. Spirited fighting was renewed in and near the gap as well as on the northern front. The most vigorous of them was made late in the day, on Bate's division, and repulsed. At night information was received from our scouts near the south end of Rocky-face, that the Army of the Tennessee was intrenching in Snake Creek Gap, and next morning reports were received which indicated a general The battle of Resaca, Georgia, May 14, 1864. from the Mountain campaigns in Georgia, etc. Published by the Western & Atlantic R. R. Co. movement of the Federal army to its right, and one report that General McPherson's troops were moving from Snake Creek Gap toward Resaca. General Polk, who had just reached that place with Loring's division, was charged with its defense. General Wheeler was directed to move next morning with all the available cavalry around the north end of Rocky-face, to learn if a general movement of the
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