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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 135 135 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 31 31 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 15 15 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 11 11 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 5 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 4 Browse Search
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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Hancock's assault-losses of the Confederates- promotions recommended-discomfiture of the enemy-ewell's attack-reducing the artillery (search)
n could be advantageously used. In fact, before reaching the James River I again reduced the artillery with the army largely. I believed that, if one corps of the army was exposed on the road to Richmond, and at a distance from the main army, Lee would endeavor to attack the exposed corps before reinforcements could come up; in which case the main army could follow Lee up and attack him before he had time to intrench. So I issued the following orders: Near Spottsylvania C. H., Va., May 18, 1864 Major-General Meade, Commanding Army of the Potomac. Before daylight to-morrow morning I propose to draw Hancock and Burnside from the position they now hold, and put Burnside to the left of Wright. Wright and Burnside should then force their way up as close to the enemy as they can get without a general engagement, or with a general engagement if the enemy will come out of their works to fight, and intrench. Hancock should march and take up a position as if in support of the two le
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 39: again in front of Richmond. (search)
s in the Army of Georgia,--the superseding of General Joseph E. Johnston by assignment of General J. B. Hood, and I was asked to take command of the corps left vacant by assignment of General Hood. Answer was made that when able for duty I would be prepared to obey orders. Later came sadder news from Virginia announcing the fall of our Cavalier J. E. B. Stuart. The most famous Chief-Quartermaster First Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. American rider fell mortally wounded on the 18th of May, 1864, near Yellow Tavern, in a cavalry engagement with General Sheridan, just then budding into fame. Stuart, endowed by nature with the gifts that go to make a perfect cavalryman, improved and cultivated through years of active warfare, experience, and discipline, was the embodiment of all that goes to make up the ideal soldierly character,--the bold, dashing dragoon. His death was possibly a greater loss to the Confederate army even than that of the swift-moving General Stonewall Jackson
has been heard since that time. The impression is, that we have been generally successful. Very brilliant reports are afloat on the streets, but whether they are reliable is the question. My nephew, Major B., has just called to tell me that his brother W. is reported missing. His battery suffered dreadfully, and he has not been seen. God grant that he may be only a prisoners We suppose that it would have been known to the fragment of his battery which is left, if he had fallen. May 18th, 1864. W. B. certainly captured. I thank God for it, as the least of casualties. Generals Lee and Grant still fighting. On the south side, Beauregard has driven Butler to Bermuda Hundreds, where he is under shelter of his gunboats. Oh! when will this fearful state of things end? May 23d, 1864. Our young relative, Lieutenant G., a member of General Stuart's staff, who was always near his person, has just been giving us a most gratifying account of General Stuart's habits. He
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
sh at Armuchee Creek. Skirmish near Rome. May 16, 1864.Skirmish near Calhoun. Action at Rome (or Parker's) Cross-Roads. Skirmish at Floyd's Spring. May 17, 1864.Engagement at Adairsville. Action at Rome. Affair at Madison Station, Ala. May 18, 1864.Skirmish at Pine Log Creek. May 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough. May 24, 1864.Skirmishes at Cass Station and CassvilMay 18-19, 1864.Combats near Kingston. Combats near Cassville. May 20, 1864.Skirmish'at Etowah River, near Cartersville. May 23, 1864.Action at Stilesborough. May 24, 1864.Skirmishes at Cass Station and Cassville. Skirmish at Burnt Hickory (or Huntsville). Skirmish near Dallas. May 25-June 5, 1864.Operations on the line of Pumpkin Vine Creek, with combats at New Hope Church, Pickett's Mills, and other points. May 26-June 1, 1864.Combats at and about Dallas. May 27, 1864.Skirmish at Pond Springs, Ala. May 29, 1864.Action at Moulton, Ala. June 9, 1864.Skirmishes near Big Shanty and near Stilesborough. June 10, 1864.Skirmish at Calhoun. June 10-July 3, 1864.Operations about Marietta, with combat
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 53: battle of Drury's Bluff, May 16, 1864. (search)
, proposing that he should be heavily reinforced from General Lee's army, so as to enable him to crush Butler in his intrenchments, and then, with the main body of his own force, together with the detachment from General Lee's army, that he should join General Lee, crush Grant, and march to Washington. Mr. Davis, in Rise and Fall. The following is the communication alluded to above. Confederate States, Headquarters Department North and South Carolina and Virginia, Hancock House, May 18, 1864, 9.30 P. M. Memorandum: The crisis demands prompt and decisive action. For this, the two armies are now too far apart, unless we consent to give up Petersburg, and place the capital in jeopardy. If General Lee will fall back behind the Chickahominy, engaging the enemy so as to draw him on, General Beauregard can bring up fifteen thousand men to unite with Breckenridge and fall upon the enemy's flank with over twenty thousand effectives-thus rendering Grant's defeat certain and decis
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
t without intermission, in rain and sunshine, against a foe in positions naturally strong, and rendered doubly so by intrenchments. He told them that the work was not yet over, but that every thing was encouraging. We shall soon receive re-enforcements, he said, which the foe cannot expect. Let us determine to continue vigorously the work so well begun, and, under God's blessing, in a short time, the object of our labors will be accomplished. General Meade's address to his soldiers, May 18, 1864. In the mean time the whole country was deeply stirred by the events of the campaign thus far, as reported by the electric and electrifying tongue of the telegraph. Upon Grant and Lee the thoughts of the whole nation were directed. From the office of Edwin M. Stanton, the successful rival in fame of L. M. N. Carnot, as a War Minister, went out bulletins, day after day, which produced the most intense anxiety and cheering hope; and on the 9th, May 1864. when the Army of the Potomac
, Mansfield, Bayard, Gaines, and Foote. On May 18, 1864, the regiment left Alexandria, Va., for theay 12, 1864 6 35 2 43 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 5 36 2 43 North Anna, Va.   2   2 Tot, 1864 3 10   13 Spotsylvania, Va., May 12-18, 1864 13 38 2 53 North Anna and Totopotomoy, Va.1 Boydton Road, Va. 1 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 24 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 1 Cold Harbor Va., June 22, 1864 6 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 12 Deep Bottom, Va. 3 North Anna, Va. 43 Va. 2 Gettysburg, Pa. 5 Guerillas, Va., May 18, 1864 1 McLean's Ford, Va. 1     Present of Petersburg, Va. 5 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 1 Hatcher's Run, March 29, 1865 1 Bowlin24 Cedar Creek, Va. 6 Spotsylvania, Va., May 18, 1864 1 Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1864 4 Cold Kernstown, Va. 16 Spotsylvania, Va., May 10-18, 1864 14 Antietam, Md. 43 North Anna, Va. 3 F2 Siege of Atlanta, Ga. 5 Kingston, Ga., May 18, 1864 1 Guerillas 1 Kenesaw Mountain, Ga. 8   [1 more...
Po River, Va. Spotsylvania.             May 10, 1864.             148th Pennsylvania Barlow's Second 23 177 -- 200 Spotsylvania, Va.             May 18, 1864.             164th New York Gibbon's Second 12 66 14 92 Spotsylvania, Va.             May 19, 1864.             1st Maine H. Artillery Tyler's Seco 22d Wisconsin Butterfield's Twentieth 11 56 1 68 21st Wisconsin Johnson's Fourteenth 10 43 -- 53 Ware Bottom Church, Va. Bermuda Hundred.             May 18-20, 1864.             97th Pennsylvania Ames's Tenth 29 186 22 237 8th Maine Ames's Tenth 13 87 -- 100 13th Indiana Ames's Tenth 13 58 19 90 67th Ohio Terry's Tenth 9 60 -- 69 142d New York Turner's Tenth 10 39 2 51 Yellow Bayou, La.             May 18, 1864.             58th Illinois Mower's Sixteenth 12 51 -- 63 North Anna, Va.             May 23-27, 1864             6th New York H. A. -----
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
at tihe Willderness, in addition to the number who were present for duty equipped. The Army of the Potomac, according to the morning report of April 30, 1864, had an aggregate present of 127,471, not including the Ninth Corps. The Virginia Campaign of ‘64 and ‘65: Humphreys; pp. 408-411. As regards the loss in the Union armies, the greatest battles of the war were: Date. Battle. Killed. Wounded. Missing. Aggregate. July 1-3, 1863. Gettysburg 3,070 14,497 5,434 23,001 May 8-18, 1864. Spotsylvania 2,725 13,416 2,258 18,399 May 5-7, 1864. Wilderness 2,246 12,037 3,383 17,666 Sept. 17, 1862. Antietam Not including South Mountain or Crampton's Gap. 2,108 9,549 753 12,410 May 1-3, 1863. Chancellorsville 1,606 9,762 5,919 17,287 Sept. 19-20, 1863. Chickamauga 1,656 9,749 4,774 16,179 June 1-4, 1864. Cold Harbor 1,844 9,077 1,816 12,737 Dec. 11-14, 1862. Fredericksburg 1,284 9,600 1,769 12,653 Aug. 28-30, 1862. Manassas Including Chantilly, Rappahan
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
und. The Rebels had a very superior knowledge of the country and had marched shorter distances. Also I consider them more daring and sudden in their movements; and I fancy their discipline on essential points is more severe than our own — that is, I fancy they shoot a man when he ought to be shot, and we do not. As to fighting, when two people fight without cessation for the best part of two days, and then come out about even, it is hard to determine. Headquarters Army of Potomac Wednesday, May 18, 1864 I have no right to complain: I have less hardship, more ease, and less exposure than most officers, and, if I must be with the army in the field, I have as good a place as one can well expect. I did hope (though there was no proper ground for it) that we might have the great blessing of an overwhelming victory. Such things you read of in books, but they do not happen often, particularly with such armies to oppose as those of the Rebels . . . . The great feature of this campa
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